Authors

F. Pattyn, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium
L. Perichon, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium
A. Aschwanden, Institute for Atmospheric and Climate Science, Zurich, SwitzerlandFollow
B. Breuer, Institute for Geophysics, University of Muenster, Germany
B. de Smedt, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium
O. Gagliardini, Laboratoire de Glaciologie et de Geophysique de l'Environnement, Saint Martin d'Heres Cedex, France
G. H. Gudmundsson, British Antarctic Survey, Natural Environment Research Council, Cambridge, UK
R. C. A. Hindmarsh, British Antarctic Survey, Natural Environment Research Council, Cambridge, UK
A. Hubbard, Institute of Geography and Earth Sciences, Aberystwyth University, Ceredigion, UK
Jesse V. Johnson, University of Montana - MissoulaFollow
T. Kleiner, Institute for Geophysics, University of Muenster, Germany
Y. Konovalov, Moscow Engineering Physics Institute, Moscow, Russia
C. Martin, British Antarctic Survey, Natural Environment Research Council, Cambridge, UK
A. J. Payne, University of Bristol, Bristol, UKFollow
D. Pollard, Pennsylvania State University - University Park, PAFollow
S. Price, University of Bristol, Bristol, UKFollow
M. Rückamp, Institute for Geophysics, University of Muenster, Germany
F. Saito, Frontier Res. Center for Global Change, Yokohama City, Kanagawa, JapanFollow
O. Soucek, Charles University Prague, Czech Republic
S. Sugiyama, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan
T. Zwinger, CSC-Scientific Computing Ltd., Espoo, Finland

Document Type

Article

Publication Title

The Cryosphere

Publisher

Copernicus Publications on behalf of the European Geosciences Union (EGU)

Publication Date

8-26-2008

Abstract

We present the results of the first ice sheet model inter comparison project for higher-order and full-Stokes ice sheet models. These models are compared and verified in a series of six experiments of which one has an analytical solution obtained from a perturbation analysis. The experiments are applied to both 2-D and 3-D geometries; five experiments are steady-state diagnostic, and one has a time dependent prognostic solution. All participating models give results that are in close agreement. A clear distinction can be made between higher-order models and those that solve the full system of equations. The full-Stokes models show a much smaller spread, hence are in better agreement with one another and with the analytical solution.

Rights

© 2008 Author(s)

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

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