Authors' Names

Leighton WieglendaFollow

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Area of Focus

Social Sciences

Abstract

Health-Seeking Behavior in Nakaseke District, Uganda

Leighton Wieglenda

MA Student

Department of Anthropology

University of Montana

Poster Presentation

Abstract

This project examines the health seeking behavior of women in the Nakaseke District of Uganda. Due to the rural and remote nature of many villages in Nakaseke District, there are very few options for health services in the area. These services consist of the local Kiwoko hospital, mobile clinics, and various kinds of traditional healers that reside in the villages.

This research is designed to shed light on whether tribal affiliation, gender, age, socioeconomic status, or/and education levels are associated with the usage of traditional healers and bio-medicine in Nakaseke District. The primary directive of the research is to provide statistical analyses that examine the relationships between these factors and the selected healthcare option. Using ArcGIS, the data also permit a geospatial analysis of these factors, giving us an understanding of any geographical patterning of health seeking behavior. GIS analysis can provide significant insights into the decision-making process when determining which healthcare option a local person might select.

Relationships among variables are analyzed using Spearman's ranked correlation, Chi squared test for independence, GPS coordinates, and Arc-Gis to determine if a correlation is present. The information gathered from the GPS coordinates will provide a geospatial perspective on the decisions that local people make after consideration of their symptoms and the local treatment options open to them. The data used for this research were gathered by an international development organization active in Central Uganda during two periods in 2011 and 2013.

The findings of this research will help medical anthropologists, clinicians and health program designers understand the shifting dynamics of health seeking behavior of women in the rural community of the Nakeseke district of Uganda. By understanding this dynamic, medical anthropologists can help to bring about educational programs and opportunities to clinicians and traditional healers in the communities. This will allow for better healing practices, which in turn will increase the likelihood of positive health outcomes for local people.

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Apr 18th, 2:30 PM Apr 18th, 3:50 PM

Health Seeking Behavior in Nakaseke District, Uganda

UC South Ballroom

Health-Seeking Behavior in Nakaseke District, Uganda

Leighton Wieglenda

MA Student

Department of Anthropology

University of Montana

Poster Presentation

Abstract

This project examines the health seeking behavior of women in the Nakaseke District of Uganda. Due to the rural and remote nature of many villages in Nakaseke District, there are very few options for health services in the area. These services consist of the local Kiwoko hospital, mobile clinics, and various kinds of traditional healers that reside in the villages.

This research is designed to shed light on whether tribal affiliation, gender, age, socioeconomic status, or/and education levels are associated with the usage of traditional healers and bio-medicine in Nakaseke District. The primary directive of the research is to provide statistical analyses that examine the relationships between these factors and the selected healthcare option. Using ArcGIS, the data also permit a geospatial analysis of these factors, giving us an understanding of any geographical patterning of health seeking behavior. GIS analysis can provide significant insights into the decision-making process when determining which healthcare option a local person might select.

Relationships among variables are analyzed using Spearman's ranked correlation, Chi squared test for independence, GPS coordinates, and Arc-Gis to determine if a correlation is present. The information gathered from the GPS coordinates will provide a geospatial perspective on the decisions that local people make after consideration of their symptoms and the local treatment options open to them. The data used for this research were gathered by an international development organization active in Central Uganda during two periods in 2011 and 2013.

The findings of this research will help medical anthropologists, clinicians and health program designers understand the shifting dynamics of health seeking behavior of women in the rural community of the Nakeseke district of Uganda. By understanding this dynamic, medical anthropologists can help to bring about educational programs and opportunities to clinicians and traditional healers in the communities. This will allow for better healing practices, which in turn will increase the likelihood of positive health outcomes for local people.