Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Area of Focus

Social Sciences

Abstract

The national obesity epidemic is disproportionately affecting Native American children. Obesity rates are 31.2% for Native preschoolers, significantly higher than other racial/ethnic groups, especially non-Hispanic White or Asian children, 12.8% of whom are obese.

This presentation will summarize the use of community partnerships as a method for solving the complex problem of childhood obesity on a Native American reservation. The Communities at Play program came to fruition with the partnership of researchers from the University, staff at a Tribal College, Tribal Health Department and community leaders. In an effort to use community collaboration to combat childhood obesity, the CAP project has four primary aims: 1) Develop partnerships, 2) Determine a collaborative agenda, 3) Educate the public, and 4) Evaluate the project.

As part of the second aim, The CAP leadership team completed a Community Readiness Assessment in six towns on the Native American Reservation. Although some members recognize childhood obesity as a problem, there exists a vague overall awareness and therefore little community motivation to do anything about it.

In order to increase community awareness and motivation, the leadership team sees a need to focus work toward fulfilling the third aim by increasing efforts to educate the public. Educational materials will include information about childhood obesity on the reservation, the results of the Community Readiness Assessment, and steps to reduce childhood obesity. To refine the content and clarity of all educational materials, we will undergo a two-part revision process. Part one will consist of an internal review of materials, and part two will include input from a focus group of area adult parents and guardians.

By doing a thorough internal revision followed by small focus groups of area parents, we will be able to improve the effectiveness of educational media and ensure we are communicating in a way that will lead toward increased reduction of child obesity. Raising awareness of the problem and its solutions will lead to increased community involvement and engagement, and facilitate the implementation of future interventions.

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Apr 14th, 9:20 AM Apr 14th, 9:40 AM

Partnerships to Prevent Childhood Obesity on a Native American Reservation: Study to Enhance Communication with Parents/Guardians and Community Members

The national obesity epidemic is disproportionately affecting Native American children. Obesity rates are 31.2% for Native preschoolers, significantly higher than other racial/ethnic groups, especially non-Hispanic White or Asian children, 12.8% of whom are obese.

This presentation will summarize the use of community partnerships as a method for solving the complex problem of childhood obesity on a Native American reservation. The Communities at Play program came to fruition with the partnership of researchers from the University, staff at a Tribal College, Tribal Health Department and community leaders. In an effort to use community collaboration to combat childhood obesity, the CAP project has four primary aims: 1) Develop partnerships, 2) Determine a collaborative agenda, 3) Educate the public, and 4) Evaluate the project.

As part of the second aim, The CAP leadership team completed a Community Readiness Assessment in six towns on the Native American Reservation. Although some members recognize childhood obesity as a problem, there exists a vague overall awareness and therefore little community motivation to do anything about it.

In order to increase community awareness and motivation, the leadership team sees a need to focus work toward fulfilling the third aim by increasing efforts to educate the public. Educational materials will include information about childhood obesity on the reservation, the results of the Community Readiness Assessment, and steps to reduce childhood obesity. To refine the content and clarity of all educational materials, we will undergo a two-part revision process. Part one will consist of an internal review of materials, and part two will include input from a focus group of area adult parents and guardians.

By doing a thorough internal revision followed by small focus groups of area parents, we will be able to improve the effectiveness of educational media and ensure we are communicating in a way that will lead toward increased reduction of child obesity. Raising awareness of the problem and its solutions will lead to increased community involvement and engagement, and facilitate the implementation of future interventions.