Self reported knowledge of concussion symptoms and management by middle and high school club lacrosse coaches

Logan Ellis

Abstract

Ellis, Logan, M.S., May 2017 Athletic Training

Self reported knowledge of concussion symptoms and management by middle and high school club lacrosse coaches

Chairperson: Valerie Moody

The game of lacrosse is one of the fastest growing sports in the United States today, with increases in participation of up to 80% in the past decade. This increase in participation has led to an increase in concussions diagnosed for both men’s and women’s lacrosse. With the number of diagnosed concussions on the rise, there is an increased reliance on trained medical professionals, coaches, parents and athletes to help in the recognition of symptoms. Many concussions still go unreported or undiagnosed either on purpose or as a function of inadequate medical coverage and knowledge of signs and symptoms by coaches, parents and athletes. Currently every state has some form of concussion legislation and are working towards improving the laws surrounding management of concussion as well as the educational requirements for medical professionals, coaches, parents, athletes. There is minimal evidence to suggest that educational materials and legislation impact overall athlete safety or the ability to recognize a symptomatic athlete. However, through further development of legislation and educational materials we can impart a change in the way we view concussion as a society, giving legitimacy to concussions as a true injury. The current study used a descriptive survey to examine concussion knowledge level of middle school and high school lacrosse coaches for men’s and women’s lacrosse. The results will be utilized to develop educational materials for coaches and impact state legislation surrounding concussion.

 
Apr 27th, 10:40 AM Apr 27th, 10:55 AM

Self reported knowledge of concussion symptoms and management by middle and high school club lacrosse coaches

UC Ballroom, Pod #2

Ellis, Logan, M.S., May 2017 Athletic Training

Self reported knowledge of concussion symptoms and management by middle and high school club lacrosse coaches

Chairperson: Valerie Moody

The game of lacrosse is one of the fastest growing sports in the United States today, with increases in participation of up to 80% in the past decade. This increase in participation has led to an increase in concussions diagnosed for both men’s and women’s lacrosse. With the number of diagnosed concussions on the rise, there is an increased reliance on trained medical professionals, coaches, parents and athletes to help in the recognition of symptoms. Many concussions still go unreported or undiagnosed either on purpose or as a function of inadequate medical coverage and knowledge of signs and symptoms by coaches, parents and athletes. Currently every state has some form of concussion legislation and are working towards improving the laws surrounding management of concussion as well as the educational requirements for medical professionals, coaches, parents, athletes. There is minimal evidence to suggest that educational materials and legislation impact overall athlete safety or the ability to recognize a symptomatic athlete. However, through further development of legislation and educational materials we can impart a change in the way we view concussion as a society, giving legitimacy to concussions as a true injury. The current study used a descriptive survey to examine concussion knowledge level of middle school and high school lacrosse coaches for men’s and women’s lacrosse. The results will be utilized to develop educational materials for coaches and impact state legislation surrounding concussion.