Title

WHAT WORKS AND WHAT FAILS: ENGAGING VETERANS TRANSITIONING OUT OF HOMELESSNESS THROUGHOUT A SEMESTER OF SERVICE LEARNING

Presenter Information

Rory Page
Luke W. Reyes

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

The Valor House is a transitional housing facility for homeless veterans in Missoula, MT. In collaboration with the Veterans Administration, the Poverello Center, and Missoula Housing Authority, the Valor House works to address the multifaceted needs of America’s largest homeless population: Veterans. Many residents of Valor House struggle with post-traumatic stress and other mental health issues, and live in individual one bedroom apartment units. Although residents might benefit greatly from group activities, guest speakers, and group classes their mental health issues cause many residents to be hesitant to participate. Therefore, as a nonresident, it is challenging to encourage residents to participate in such planned events. Drawing on two Valor House volunteers’ experiences, this presentation examines the various methods used to encourage veterans to participate in organized activities at the Valor House, and explores the failures and successes of the methods used . We will conclude by offering suggestions about successful strategies for engaging Veterans in events such as fly fishing, bowling, financial and anger management classes, mental health seminars and AA meetings.

Category

Social Sciences

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Apr 15th, 9:20 AM Apr 15th, 9:40 AM

WHAT WORKS AND WHAT FAILS: ENGAGING VETERANS TRANSITIONING OUT OF HOMELESSNESS THROUGHOUT A SEMESTER OF SERVICE LEARNING

UC 326

The Valor House is a transitional housing facility for homeless veterans in Missoula, MT. In collaboration with the Veterans Administration, the Poverello Center, and Missoula Housing Authority, the Valor House works to address the multifaceted needs of America’s largest homeless population: Veterans. Many residents of Valor House struggle with post-traumatic stress and other mental health issues, and live in individual one bedroom apartment units. Although residents might benefit greatly from group activities, guest speakers, and group classes their mental health issues cause many residents to be hesitant to participate. Therefore, as a nonresident, it is challenging to encourage residents to participate in such planned events. Drawing on two Valor House volunteers’ experiences, this presentation examines the various methods used to encourage veterans to participate in organized activities at the Valor House, and explores the failures and successes of the methods used . We will conclude by offering suggestions about successful strategies for engaging Veterans in events such as fly fishing, bowling, financial and anger management classes, mental health seminars and AA meetings.