Title

CHOLINERGIC CONTROL OF NEUROLOGICAL FUNCTION: DISSECTING THE PUZZLING PATHWAYS INVOLVED IN LEARNING, MEMORY, AND MOVEMENT

Presenter Information

Kurt Stoll

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

PURPOSE: Acetylcholine (ACh) is a neurotransmitter in central and peripheral nervous systems involved in learning, memory, and movement. Previous studies have shown abnormal phenotypes, such as hyperactivity and cognitive deficits, in mice lacking specific types of acetylcholine receptors. Because of the diverse distribution of acetylcholine receptors, our ability to investigate specific neuronal pathways has been limited. One approach is to target a specific subset of cells expressing acetylcholine receptors through transgenic recombination. Using this approach, we have successfully generated a mouse line, the PV-CRE/FM1 mouse, which is deficient in M1 acetylcholine receptors on parvalbumin (PV+) positive cells, which will allow for specific investigation of acetylcholine functioning in this key subset of inhibitory cells.

METHOD: Utilizing state-of-the-art animal tracking software, abnormal hyperactivity and/or cognitive deficits, if present, can be detected in homozygous PV-CRE/FM1 mice compared to a wild type control group.

ORIGINALITY: Global M1 knockout mice have shown a number of abnormal phenotypes, including hyperactivity and cognitive deficits. With transgenic recombination, M1 receptors can specifically be eliminated from PV+ inhibitory cells, which will allow the examination of specific M1 mAChR and their effects across specific neuronal pathways.

SIGNIFICANCE: Understanding the neurological pathways involved is essential in targeting and treating neurological disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, and epilepsy. Examining the PV-CRE/FM1 mice may allow for another puzzle piece to be added to the complicated pathways of the cholinergic system and bring forth innovative treatments to be implemented in patients suffering from these devastating neurological diseases.

Category

Physical Sciences

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Apr 15th, 9:40 AM Apr 15th, 10:00 AM

CHOLINERGIC CONTROL OF NEUROLOGICAL FUNCTION: DISSECTING THE PUZZLING PATHWAYS INVOLVED IN LEARNING, MEMORY, AND MOVEMENT

UC 327

PURPOSE: Acetylcholine (ACh) is a neurotransmitter in central and peripheral nervous systems involved in learning, memory, and movement. Previous studies have shown abnormal phenotypes, such as hyperactivity and cognitive deficits, in mice lacking specific types of acetylcholine receptors. Because of the diverse distribution of acetylcholine receptors, our ability to investigate specific neuronal pathways has been limited. One approach is to target a specific subset of cells expressing acetylcholine receptors through transgenic recombination. Using this approach, we have successfully generated a mouse line, the PV-CRE/FM1 mouse, which is deficient in M1 acetylcholine receptors on parvalbumin (PV+) positive cells, which will allow for specific investigation of acetylcholine functioning in this key subset of inhibitory cells.

METHOD: Utilizing state-of-the-art animal tracking software, abnormal hyperactivity and/or cognitive deficits, if present, can be detected in homozygous PV-CRE/FM1 mice compared to a wild type control group.

ORIGINALITY: Global M1 knockout mice have shown a number of abnormal phenotypes, including hyperactivity and cognitive deficits. With transgenic recombination, M1 receptors can specifically be eliminated from PV+ inhibitory cells, which will allow the examination of specific M1 mAChR and their effects across specific neuronal pathways.

SIGNIFICANCE: Understanding the neurological pathways involved is essential in targeting and treating neurological disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, and epilepsy. Examining the PV-CRE/FM1 mice may allow for another puzzle piece to be added to the complicated pathways of the cholinergic system and bring forth innovative treatments to be implemented in patients suffering from these devastating neurological diseases.