Title

PRODUCT PLACEMENT: UNETHICAL SHILLING, OR SMART MARKETING?

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

Product placement refers to advertisers incorporating their product into mainstream media in such a way that the campaign is not obvious to the casual observer. For example, a company will pay for a movie character to take a refreshing sip of Diet Coke© instead of drinking from a generic “Cola” can. This craze of product placement as a marketing campaign is starting to take over the advertising world; not only is it increasing in frequency of use in popular media, but the actual placement of the “advertised” good is becoming progressively more creative. Advertisers have gotten so skilled at easing their merchandise or service into the regular content of media that most consumers are not directly aware of it. However, product placement can pose an ethical problem: Since consumers are not conscious of being advertised to, is it ethical? Should viewers be informed or be able to give consent to viewing paid product placement in the shows they watch? Using literature rieviews and interviews with experts in the field, I will assess the impact product placement has on consumers, and, following a guide to business ethics, determine the ethics of shilling (marketing without knowledge or consent) in media. The idea that consumers should be able to give consent to advertisement is a novel idea, one that has not been thoroughly researched in this country. This could prove to be an important step toward a better customer relationship strategy for many companies.

Category

Social Sciences

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Apr 15th, 1:40 PM Apr 15th, 2:00 PM

PRODUCT PLACEMENT: UNETHICAL SHILLING, OR SMART MARKETING?

UC 330

Product placement refers to advertisers incorporating their product into mainstream media in such a way that the campaign is not obvious to the casual observer. For example, a company will pay for a movie character to take a refreshing sip of Diet Coke© instead of drinking from a generic “Cola” can. This craze of product placement as a marketing campaign is starting to take over the advertising world; not only is it increasing in frequency of use in popular media, but the actual placement of the “advertised” good is becoming progressively more creative. Advertisers have gotten so skilled at easing their merchandise or service into the regular content of media that most consumers are not directly aware of it. However, product placement can pose an ethical problem: Since consumers are not conscious of being advertised to, is it ethical? Should viewers be informed or be able to give consent to viewing paid product placement in the shows they watch? Using literature rieviews and interviews with experts in the field, I will assess the impact product placement has on consumers, and, following a guide to business ethics, determine the ethics of shilling (marketing without knowledge or consent) in media. The idea that consumers should be able to give consent to advertisement is a novel idea, one that has not been thoroughly researched in this country. This could prove to be an important step toward a better customer relationship strategy for many companies.