Title

INDIGENOUS RIGHTS AND ENVIRONMENTAL DEGRADATION

Presenter Information

Loren Guerin

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

Western society’s interest in economic development has continued to expand the extraction of this gold around the world . It is essential to analyzethe impacts of gold mining on human rights, international relations, and how the adverse affects can be mitigated. I examined two gold mines in Latin America—Marlin Mine in Guatemala and Yanacocha in Peru. First, I looked at the companies --their history, their social responsibility track record and any recent news of their impacts. Second, I also looked at the countries – their historical, political, and economic background, and most importantly their indigenous populations. This includes local laws surrounding water, land rights, and mineral usage as well as the historical and current events surrounding the relationship between indigenous peoples and the government. The indigenous group research includes a brief history of the tribes, but focuses primarily on the current struggles facing the indigenous peoples in regards to health, job security, and land rights. Finally, combining scientific studies, news articles, and peer reviewed, I evaluate the overall sustainability of gold mining and its future relevance.

The developing nations that are being exploited for gold use have long histories as sustainable societies. It’s a grave mistake to destroy these cultures and ecologically diverse places at the expense of basic human rights. With this project I lay out several of the main issues, as well as possible solutions, and propose ways to protect human rights and sustainable indigenous cultures.

Category

Social Sciences

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Apr 15th, 2:20 PM Apr 15th, 2:40 PM

INDIGENOUS RIGHTS AND ENVIRONMENTAL DEGRADATION

UC 332

Western society’s interest in economic development has continued to expand the extraction of this gold around the world . It is essential to analyzethe impacts of gold mining on human rights, international relations, and how the adverse affects can be mitigated. I examined two gold mines in Latin America—Marlin Mine in Guatemala and Yanacocha in Peru. First, I looked at the companies --their history, their social responsibility track record and any recent news of their impacts. Second, I also looked at the countries – their historical, political, and economic background, and most importantly their indigenous populations. This includes local laws surrounding water, land rights, and mineral usage as well as the historical and current events surrounding the relationship between indigenous peoples and the government. The indigenous group research includes a brief history of the tribes, but focuses primarily on the current struggles facing the indigenous peoples in regards to health, job security, and land rights. Finally, combining scientific studies, news articles, and peer reviewed, I evaluate the overall sustainability of gold mining and its future relevance.

The developing nations that are being exploited for gold use have long histories as sustainable societies. It’s a grave mistake to destroy these cultures and ecologically diverse places at the expense of basic human rights. With this project I lay out several of the main issues, as well as possible solutions, and propose ways to protect human rights and sustainable indigenous cultures.