Title

EXPLORING THE RELATIONSHIP OF STRUCTURE AND RESILIENCY: A STUDY OF HOMELESS FAMILIES AT THE JOSEPH RESIDENCE

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

As a part of Poverello Inc., the Joseph Residence aims to break generational cycle poverty and homelessness in Missoula, Montana. For the purpose of our research, generational poverty was defined as the condition of being in poverty for two generations or longer. The Joseph Residence aims to create a stable community through offering subsidized housing, thereby allowing individuals to work toward independent living. This presentation explores how the structure, programs, and individual case management offered by the Joseph Residence impacted the program participants' development of healthy relationships, feelings of accomplishment, and sense of connection to a larger community. These factors are important to our understanding of how, when transmitted from parents to children, the likelihood of future poverty and homelessness can be reduced. Our research drew upon three sources of data: field notes, in-depth interviews, and information provided by staff. We found that the stability and structure provided by the Joseph Residence enabled families to develop the resiliency to overcome homelessness.

Category

Social Sciences

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Apr 15th, 2:00 PM Apr 15th, 2:20 PM

EXPLORING THE RELATIONSHIP OF STRUCTURE AND RESILIENCY: A STUDY OF HOMELESS FAMILIES AT THE JOSEPH RESIDENCE

UC 333

As a part of Poverello Inc., the Joseph Residence aims to break generational cycle poverty and homelessness in Missoula, Montana. For the purpose of our research, generational poverty was defined as the condition of being in poverty for two generations or longer. The Joseph Residence aims to create a stable community through offering subsidized housing, thereby allowing individuals to work toward independent living. This presentation explores how the structure, programs, and individual case management offered by the Joseph Residence impacted the program participants' development of healthy relationships, feelings of accomplishment, and sense of connection to a larger community. These factors are important to our understanding of how, when transmitted from parents to children, the likelihood of future poverty and homelessness can be reduced. Our research drew upon three sources of data: field notes, in-depth interviews, and information provided by staff. We found that the stability and structure provided by the Joseph Residence enabled families to develop the resiliency to overcome homelessness.