Title

SOCIAL DESIRABILITY BIAS EFFECTS ON THE UNDERREPORTING OF TRANSPHOBIA

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

Hill and Willoughby (2005) questioned whether self report questionnaires could accurately measure attitudes and behaviors related to transphobia. Because self report measures are susceptible to social desirability bias, it is unclear if individuals underreport transphobic attitudes and behaviors. Using an experimental design to control for social desirability bias, it is predicted that a significant difference will exist between two groups of college age participants in the reporting of transphobic attitudes and behaviors. A total of 160 undergraduate students will participate in this study, with approximately half randomly assigned to an experimental condition designed to minimize social desirability bias. A deceptive paradigm, known as the bogus pipeline will be used to incentivize participants to be truthful in their reporting of transphobia. Participants will complete a standard demographic questionnaire and the Genderism and Transphobia Scale. Previous data collected from 170 undergraduate students indicated that participants in the experimental condition reported more homophobic behaviors (M = 20.74, SD = 3.67) than participants in the control condition (M = 19.80, SD = 2.64), a difference that approached statistical significance (p = .082). For this study, we will enhance the saliency of the experimental manipulation, and we expect to find that participants in this condition will report significantly more transphobic attitudes and behaviors. The results are expected to show that social desirability bias may influence people’s reporting of transphobia. This is the first experiment to investigate the influence of social desirability bias on the reporting of transphobic attitudes and behaviors.

Category

Social Sciences

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Apr 15th, 4:20 PM Apr 15th, 4:40 PM

SOCIAL DESIRABILITY BIAS EFFECTS ON THE UNDERREPORTING OF TRANSPHOBIA

UC 333

Hill and Willoughby (2005) questioned whether self report questionnaires could accurately measure attitudes and behaviors related to transphobia. Because self report measures are susceptible to social desirability bias, it is unclear if individuals underreport transphobic attitudes and behaviors. Using an experimental design to control for social desirability bias, it is predicted that a significant difference will exist between two groups of college age participants in the reporting of transphobic attitudes and behaviors. A total of 160 undergraduate students will participate in this study, with approximately half randomly assigned to an experimental condition designed to minimize social desirability bias. A deceptive paradigm, known as the bogus pipeline will be used to incentivize participants to be truthful in their reporting of transphobia. Participants will complete a standard demographic questionnaire and the Genderism and Transphobia Scale. Previous data collected from 170 undergraduate students indicated that participants in the experimental condition reported more homophobic behaviors (M = 20.74, SD = 3.67) than participants in the control condition (M = 19.80, SD = 2.64), a difference that approached statistical significance (p = .082). For this study, we will enhance the saliency of the experimental manipulation, and we expect to find that participants in this condition will report significantly more transphobic attitudes and behaviors. The results are expected to show that social desirability bias may influence people’s reporting of transphobia. This is the first experiment to investigate the influence of social desirability bias on the reporting of transphobic attitudes and behaviors.