Title

INHALATION OF PURE AND PYROLYZED METHAMPHETAMINE EFFECTS LUNG INFLAMMATION

Presentation Type

Poster

Abstract

The illegal psychostimulant methamphetamine (MA) is the second most widely used drug in the world and causes serious side effects including lung injury and inflammation upon the increasingly common use of MA by smoking. Although MA has been reported to produce immunomodulatory effects, little is known regarding its direct effect on alveolar macrophages (innate immune cells of the lung). In this study, the effects of MA on alveolar macrophages in Balb/c mice were studied using in vitro and ex vivo experiments. Macrophages were collected by lavage 2 h after intranasal instillation of differing doses of MA (0-10 mg/kg body weight). The doses and route of exposure were chosen to mimic MA use in humans. Ex vivo studies indicated that with increasing MA dose and bacterial lipopolysaccharide stimulation, macrophage production of IL-1 beta increased, IL-6 decreased slightly, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha was constant, and macrophage viability was unaffected. These results were consistent with increased IL-1 beta and decreased IL-6 release in vitro following MA exposure. These results support previous studies showing smoking MA increases acute lung inflammation. The grants used to support this project are R25 E5016247 and P20 RR017670.

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Apr 15th, 11:00 AM Apr 15th, 12:00 PM

INHALATION OF PURE AND PYROLYZED METHAMPHETAMINE EFFECTS LUNG INFLAMMATION

UC South Ballroom

The illegal psychostimulant methamphetamine (MA) is the second most widely used drug in the world and causes serious side effects including lung injury and inflammation upon the increasingly common use of MA by smoking. Although MA has been reported to produce immunomodulatory effects, little is known regarding its direct effect on alveolar macrophages (innate immune cells of the lung). In this study, the effects of MA on alveolar macrophages in Balb/c mice were studied using in vitro and ex vivo experiments. Macrophages were collected by lavage 2 h after intranasal instillation of differing doses of MA (0-10 mg/kg body weight). The doses and route of exposure were chosen to mimic MA use in humans. Ex vivo studies indicated that with increasing MA dose and bacterial lipopolysaccharide stimulation, macrophage production of IL-1 beta increased, IL-6 decreased slightly, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha was constant, and macrophage viability was unaffected. These results were consistent with increased IL-1 beta and decreased IL-6 release in vitro following MA exposure. These results support previous studies showing smoking MA increases acute lung inflammation. The grants used to support this project are R25 E5016247 and P20 RR017670.