Title

LOCAL VS. DISTAL THRUST PLATES AS SOURCES OF INDIANOLA CONGLOMERATE, EAST-CENTRAL UTAH

Presenter Information

Billy Backer
Patrick Doyle
Anne O'Reilly

Presentation Type

Poster

Abstract

The Sevier orogeny was active from late Jurassic to late Cretaceous time and formed in response to eastward subduction of the Farallon Plate beneath the North American Plate. The Late Cretaceous was a time of significant synorogenic sedimentation in east-central Utah where the Indianola conglomerate is located. This conglomerate is interpreted to have been deposited during this synorogenic phase of sedimentation. We hypothesize that synorgenic sediments were deposited in response to local deformation and from deposition of coarse clastics derived from other parts of the fold-thrust belt and transport parallel to structural strike. In this study, we seek to investigate the relative importance of local vs. more distal thrust plates as the source of the synorogenic conglomerate. We anticipate that sediment derived from different parts of the fold-thrust belt will have different compositions and different paleoflow indicator directions. We expect documentation of the conglomerate clast composition and stratigraphy to reflect provenance, paleocurrent dispersal patterns and to yield information about the source of the synorogenic sediments.

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Apr 15th, 11:00 AM Apr 15th, 12:00 PM

LOCAL VS. DISTAL THRUST PLATES AS SOURCES OF INDIANOLA CONGLOMERATE, EAST-CENTRAL UTAH

UC South Ballroom

The Sevier orogeny was active from late Jurassic to late Cretaceous time and formed in response to eastward subduction of the Farallon Plate beneath the North American Plate. The Late Cretaceous was a time of significant synorogenic sedimentation in east-central Utah where the Indianola conglomerate is located. This conglomerate is interpreted to have been deposited during this synorogenic phase of sedimentation. We hypothesize that synorgenic sediments were deposited in response to local deformation and from deposition of coarse clastics derived from other parts of the fold-thrust belt and transport parallel to structural strike. In this study, we seek to investigate the relative importance of local vs. more distal thrust plates as the source of the synorogenic conglomerate. We anticipate that sediment derived from different parts of the fold-thrust belt will have different compositions and different paleoflow indicator directions. We expect documentation of the conglomerate clast composition and stratigraphy to reflect provenance, paleocurrent dispersal patterns and to yield information about the source of the synorogenic sediments.