Title

AEROR BREATHER AND BELIEF EFFECTS ON SUBMAXIMAL LIFTING

Presenter Information

Tim Weber
Gene White

Presentation Type

Poster

Abstract

Breathing during resistance exercises is important to help increase performance. Makers of the Aeror Breather® claim it increases airflow in the body and overall performance during resistance exercises. PURPOSE: Our purpose was to evaluate if the Aeror Breather® device increases submaximal lifting repetitions to failure during lat pull down exercise. METHODS: Thirty-two voluntary subjects (17 females, 15 males; 76.4 kg ± 19.2 kg, 174 cm ± 9.7 cm) first completed a one repetition max test of a lat-pulldown exercise and then came in two more times to test their submaximal capacities with and without the aid of the Aeror Breather® in a randomized cross over design. Subjects performed the lat-pulldown at 65% of their 1 RM with half of those subjects using the Aeror Breather®. A dependent t-test was used to evaluate the results of the two trials. RESULTS: There was an increase in the number of repetitions subjects were able to perform with the aid of the Aeror Breather® (+0.75 ± 2.96 stdev repetitions @ 65% 1RM; p< 0.05). CONCLUSION: This data suggests that the Aeror Breather® may be beneficial and improves number of submaximal repetitions by a statistically significant 5.6%. However, further research needs to be done to evaluate the effects of the Aeror Breather® on other resistance exercises and at higher submaximal levels.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 15th, 11:00 AM Apr 15th, 12:00 PM

AEROR BREATHER AND BELIEF EFFECTS ON SUBMAXIMAL LIFTING

UC South Ballroom

Breathing during resistance exercises is important to help increase performance. Makers of the Aeror Breather® claim it increases airflow in the body and overall performance during resistance exercises. PURPOSE: Our purpose was to evaluate if the Aeror Breather® device increases submaximal lifting repetitions to failure during lat pull down exercise. METHODS: Thirty-two voluntary subjects (17 females, 15 males; 76.4 kg ± 19.2 kg, 174 cm ± 9.7 cm) first completed a one repetition max test of a lat-pulldown exercise and then came in two more times to test their submaximal capacities with and without the aid of the Aeror Breather® in a randomized cross over design. Subjects performed the lat-pulldown at 65% of their 1 RM with half of those subjects using the Aeror Breather®. A dependent t-test was used to evaluate the results of the two trials. RESULTS: There was an increase in the number of repetitions subjects were able to perform with the aid of the Aeror Breather® (+0.75 ± 2.96 stdev repetitions @ 65% 1RM; p< 0.05). CONCLUSION: This data suggests that the Aeror Breather® may be beneficial and improves number of submaximal repetitions by a statistically significant 5.6%. However, further research needs to be done to evaluate the effects of the Aeror Breather® on other resistance exercises and at higher submaximal levels.