Title

GENERALIZATION WITHIN SOUND CLASSES DURING CYCLES PHONOLOGICAL REMEDIATION APPROACH

Presenter Information

Ann Bugni
Christina C. Pagel

Presentation Type

Poster

Abstract

Phonological disorders affecting production of speech sounds are prevalent in the preschool and school-aged population hindering their speech intelligibility and ability to communicate clearly. Clinicians have multiple approaches available to choose from while treating these disorders, yet research providing evidence of efficacy is not readily available. The current study specifically examined the effectiveness of the Cycles Phonological Remediation Approach by analyzing data collected from the treatment of two preschool aged children with phonological disorder. The participants were seen for treatment twice a week over a six month period. One speech sound was selected to be targeted over the course of two sessions before moving on to a target from a different speech class. The change of treatment target was not dependent on the client’s success in previous sessions. A weekly test (probe) was administered involving 50 non-practiced words representing all of the sound classes. During the study 27 probes were collected over time to chart the correct productions within each sound class. The change in accuracy of untreated productions compared to the weekly selected treatment targets was examined to determine generalization within sound classes. The results of this study will provide evidence for the success of generalization during Cycles treatment and help to establish the efficacy of its use in clinical practice.

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Apr 15th, 11:00 AM Apr 15th, 12:00 PM

GENERALIZATION WITHIN SOUND CLASSES DURING CYCLES PHONOLOGICAL REMEDIATION APPROACH

UC South Ballroom

Phonological disorders affecting production of speech sounds are prevalent in the preschool and school-aged population hindering their speech intelligibility and ability to communicate clearly. Clinicians have multiple approaches available to choose from while treating these disorders, yet research providing evidence of efficacy is not readily available. The current study specifically examined the effectiveness of the Cycles Phonological Remediation Approach by analyzing data collected from the treatment of two preschool aged children with phonological disorder. The participants were seen for treatment twice a week over a six month period. One speech sound was selected to be targeted over the course of two sessions before moving on to a target from a different speech class. The change of treatment target was not dependent on the client’s success in previous sessions. A weekly test (probe) was administered involving 50 non-practiced words representing all of the sound classes. During the study 27 probes were collected over time to chart the correct productions within each sound class. The change in accuracy of untreated productions compared to the weekly selected treatment targets was examined to determine generalization within sound classes. The results of this study will provide evidence for the success of generalization during Cycles treatment and help to establish the efficacy of its use in clinical practice.