Title

THE EFFECTS OF 5 WEEKS OF UNLOADED PLYOMETRIC TRAINING ON POWER DEVELOPEMENT

Presenter Information

Tyson Strom

Presentation Type

Poster

Abstract

PURPOSE: To evaluate power development after five weeks of unloaded (bungee assisted) or no-weight added plyometric jump training. METHODS: Thirty-five volunteer participants (22 females, 13 males; 24 ± 6 years, 68 ± 22 kg, 72 ± 11 cm) completed five weeks of plyometric jump training. Subjects were randomly assigned to an unloaded or a no-weight added group. A power assessment was performed pre-, mid- (week three) and post training. The power assessment consisted of a vertical jump, a series of ten repeated vertical jumps, stair runs, a 30 meter sprint, and a two footed-5 hop test for distance. Jump training was completed twice a week with at least 48 hours of rest between sessions. Each session consisted of three sets of 10 reps of plyometric jumping (either unloaded or no-weight). Statistical analysis was performed using a time x trial ANOVA, significance was set at 0.05. ORIGINALITY: Many studies have been performed on the effects of plyometric jumping but few have focused on bungee assisted jumping exercises. RESULTS: There were no group interactions for any of the five tests that were conducted during the pre-, mid-, and post assessment (p>0.05). CONCLUSION: These data suggest that there is no effect on power development when using unloaded plyometric training.

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Apr 15th, 3:00 PM Apr 15th, 4:00 PM

THE EFFECTS OF 5 WEEKS OF UNLOADED PLYOMETRIC TRAINING ON POWER DEVELOPEMENT

UC South Ballroom

PURPOSE: To evaluate power development after five weeks of unloaded (bungee assisted) or no-weight added plyometric jump training. METHODS: Thirty-five volunteer participants (22 females, 13 males; 24 ± 6 years, 68 ± 22 kg, 72 ± 11 cm) completed five weeks of plyometric jump training. Subjects were randomly assigned to an unloaded or a no-weight added group. A power assessment was performed pre-, mid- (week three) and post training. The power assessment consisted of a vertical jump, a series of ten repeated vertical jumps, stair runs, a 30 meter sprint, and a two footed-5 hop test for distance. Jump training was completed twice a week with at least 48 hours of rest between sessions. Each session consisted of three sets of 10 reps of plyometric jumping (either unloaded or no-weight). Statistical analysis was performed using a time x trial ANOVA, significance was set at 0.05. ORIGINALITY: Many studies have been performed on the effects of plyometric jumping but few have focused on bungee assisted jumping exercises. RESULTS: There were no group interactions for any of the five tests that were conducted during the pre-, mid-, and post assessment (p>0.05). CONCLUSION: These data suggest that there is no effect on power development when using unloaded plyometric training.