Title

Song of the Tui, an Exploration of New Zealand Birds

Presenter Information

Clare Antonioli

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

An important and integral part of the education of a dance student is identifying and exploring one’s creative process. Embarking on a choreographic process, the making of a new and original dance, enables one to learn about her or his creative process. Through the course of the 2011-2012 academic year, I have been and will continue to be choreographing a new dance entitled “Song of the Tui, an exploration of New Zealand Birds.” This piece is an investigation of the habitat, ecology, and behavior of New Zealand Birds. In the process of making “Song of the Tui, an exploration of New Zealand Birds” I have been researching the mating structure, social organization, and conservation of five New Zealand birds (The Tui, Fantail, Kiwi, Kea, and Albatross). My choreographic intention is to showcase these exotic birds and educate audiences about New Zealand conservation and New Zealand bird life. I am taking movement inspiration from these birds and translating it into dance vocabulary for the University of Montana dance students who will perform the work.

Category

Visual and Performing Arts (including Creative Writing)

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Apr 13th, 2:00 PM Apr 13th, 2:20 PM

Song of the Tui, an Exploration of New Zealand Birds

UC 331

An important and integral part of the education of a dance student is identifying and exploring one’s creative process. Embarking on a choreographic process, the making of a new and original dance, enables one to learn about her or his creative process. Through the course of the 2011-2012 academic year, I have been and will continue to be choreographing a new dance entitled “Song of the Tui, an exploration of New Zealand Birds.” This piece is an investigation of the habitat, ecology, and behavior of New Zealand Birds. In the process of making “Song of the Tui, an exploration of New Zealand Birds” I have been researching the mating structure, social organization, and conservation of five New Zealand birds (The Tui, Fantail, Kiwi, Kea, and Albatross). My choreographic intention is to showcase these exotic birds and educate audiences about New Zealand conservation and New Zealand bird life. I am taking movement inspiration from these birds and translating it into dance vocabulary for the University of Montana dance students who will perform the work.