Title

Assessment of Skill Acquisition and Athletic Training Student Satisfaction in Clinical Education

Presenter Information

Kiri Weeks

Presentation Type

Poster

Abstract

Athletic training education programs strive to provide valuable and successful clinical experiences to athletic training students (ATS). Clinical experiences are designed with the goal of hands-on learning, allowing students to integrate and practice the skills they learn in the classroom into clinical/real-life situations. Few studies have evaluated the number of authentic experiences that ATS receive in clinical education and related this to overall student satisfaction. The purpose of this study was two-fold: To determine how ATS spend their time on clinical rotations and to determine if ATS are satisfied with their clinical experiences. Four athletic training education programs in the Northwest Athletic Trainers’ Association agreed to participate. A total of 77 ATS completed a paper survey containing 3 parts: 1) demographic/background information; 2) athletic training skill log to be filled out daily for one month; 3) clinical experience satisfaction survey. Statistical analysis shows there is a positive weak correlation between total number of skills performed and daily satisfaction (r = 0.275, p =0.01), and total number of skills performed and overall satisfaction for the month (r = 0.246, p = 0.03). Of skills performed, 44% were modalities, 32% taping/wrapping, 14% rehab, 7% evaluation, and 3% acute care. Athletic training students who were allowed to integrate the skills they learn into clinical practice tended to be more satisfied with their clinical experiences. It appears that ATS are not receiving as many opportunities with injury evaluation, rehabilitation, or acute care in their clinical rotations as compared to applying modalities or taping. Program directors and clinical instructors should be aware of this and try to create more opportunities for students to gain experience in these areas.

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Apr 13th, 11:00 AM Apr 13th, 12:00 PM

Assessment of Skill Acquisition and Athletic Training Student Satisfaction in Clinical Education

UC Ballroom

Athletic training education programs strive to provide valuable and successful clinical experiences to athletic training students (ATS). Clinical experiences are designed with the goal of hands-on learning, allowing students to integrate and practice the skills they learn in the classroom into clinical/real-life situations. Few studies have evaluated the number of authentic experiences that ATS receive in clinical education and related this to overall student satisfaction. The purpose of this study was two-fold: To determine how ATS spend their time on clinical rotations and to determine if ATS are satisfied with their clinical experiences. Four athletic training education programs in the Northwest Athletic Trainers’ Association agreed to participate. A total of 77 ATS completed a paper survey containing 3 parts: 1) demographic/background information; 2) athletic training skill log to be filled out daily for one month; 3) clinical experience satisfaction survey. Statistical analysis shows there is a positive weak correlation between total number of skills performed and daily satisfaction (r = 0.275, p =0.01), and total number of skills performed and overall satisfaction for the month (r = 0.246, p = 0.03). Of skills performed, 44% were modalities, 32% taping/wrapping, 14% rehab, 7% evaluation, and 3% acute care. Athletic training students who were allowed to integrate the skills they learn into clinical practice tended to be more satisfied with their clinical experiences. It appears that ATS are not receiving as many opportunities with injury evaluation, rehabilitation, or acute care in their clinical rotations as compared to applying modalities or taping. Program directors and clinical instructors should be aware of this and try to create more opportunities for students to gain experience in these areas.