Title

Students Misuse Adderall & Concerta at the University of Montana

Presenter Information

Erin Burt

Presentation Type

Poster

Abstract

Objective: This study was conducted to examine subjects’ use and misuse of Adderall and Concerta by assessing their understanding of potential physiologic adverse effects. Methods: Data was collected by administering a survey to students between the ages of 18-32, currently enrolled at the University of Montana. A total of 115 students completed the survey and their participation was voluntary. The research was conducted on campus in the University Center. The survey consisted of 15 multiple-choice questions evaluating the frequency of use and occurrence of drug side effects. Follow up education about the side effects was provided upon survey completion. Results: Twenty-nine (25%) utilized Adderall and Concerta during their college experience. Twenty-one (72% of users) consumed these drugs without a physician’s prescription. Of the users without a prescription, 57% were unable to identify their medication dosage. 25% of the users with a prescription could correctly identify a majority of the drugs’ common side effects; however, only 10% of users without prescription could execute the same task. Conclusion: From our preliminary study, there is an apparent trend for students within their college years to illicitly use Adderall or Concerta. This trend is accompanied by a lack of understanding of the medications’ physiologic effects. There is a strong need for better education and awareness regarding the effects and risks associated with prescription stimulants. Due to the severity of these medications’ adverse effects, further investigation is justified.

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Apr 13th, 11:00 AM Apr 13th, 12:00 PM

Students Misuse Adderall & Concerta at the University of Montana

UC Ballroom

Objective: This study was conducted to examine subjects’ use and misuse of Adderall and Concerta by assessing their understanding of potential physiologic adverse effects. Methods: Data was collected by administering a survey to students between the ages of 18-32, currently enrolled at the University of Montana. A total of 115 students completed the survey and their participation was voluntary. The research was conducted on campus in the University Center. The survey consisted of 15 multiple-choice questions evaluating the frequency of use and occurrence of drug side effects. Follow up education about the side effects was provided upon survey completion. Results: Twenty-nine (25%) utilized Adderall and Concerta during their college experience. Twenty-one (72% of users) consumed these drugs without a physician’s prescription. Of the users without a prescription, 57% were unable to identify their medication dosage. 25% of the users with a prescription could correctly identify a majority of the drugs’ common side effects; however, only 10% of users without prescription could execute the same task. Conclusion: From our preliminary study, there is an apparent trend for students within their college years to illicitly use Adderall or Concerta. This trend is accompanied by a lack of understanding of the medications’ physiologic effects. There is a strong need for better education and awareness regarding the effects and risks associated with prescription stimulants. Due to the severity of these medications’ adverse effects, further investigation is justified.