Title

Noise-Induced Hearing Loss and the use of Personal Music Devices

Presenter Information

Emily Berendts
Allix Linrude

Presentation Type

Poster

Abstract

Popularity in multimedia usage, specifically personal music devices such as the iPod, has been rising ever since the new technologies became available. The use of these personal music devices has changed our music listening habits. We are now able to listen with earphones or earbuds, for long periods of time at high levels of volume. Recent research has shown that 1 in 5 adolescents are now experiencing a hearing loss, presumably from personal music devices. This research was designed as an educational experience for high school students to understand the lifelong consequences of hearing damage from listening to personal music devices. This research project had four phases; 1) class presentation given in Health Classes in Missoula High Schools including pre and post assessment of knowledge of hearing loss from listening devices; 2) after school testing of hearing of each student; 3) after school testing of levels produced by an individual student iPod and 4) a student survey of the multimedia listening habits for each participating student. The results from each of the phases of this research project will be discussed.

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Apr 13th, 11:00 AM Apr 13th, 12:00 PM

Noise-Induced Hearing Loss and the use of Personal Music Devices

UC Ballroom

Popularity in multimedia usage, specifically personal music devices such as the iPod, has been rising ever since the new technologies became available. The use of these personal music devices has changed our music listening habits. We are now able to listen with earphones or earbuds, for long periods of time at high levels of volume. Recent research has shown that 1 in 5 adolescents are now experiencing a hearing loss, presumably from personal music devices. This research was designed as an educational experience for high school students to understand the lifelong consequences of hearing damage from listening to personal music devices. This research project had four phases; 1) class presentation given in Health Classes in Missoula High Schools including pre and post assessment of knowledge of hearing loss from listening devices; 2) after school testing of hearing of each student; 3) after school testing of levels produced by an individual student iPod and 4) a student survey of the multimedia listening habits for each participating student. The results from each of the phases of this research project will be discussed.