Title

One More Round: The Best Materials for Cooling the Face in 60 Seconds or Less

Presenter Information

Tyler Beauregard
Jade Vaile
Lucas Whitney

Presentation Type

Poster

Abstract

Facial swelling is a common cause for the termination of boxing and mixed martial arts contests. Currently, facial swelling is treated between rounds by applying pressure with a piece of steel, which has been kept on ice, for approximately 45 seconds. Many studies have been conducted to determine the most effective application of cold to reduce swelling in a clinical setting but there has been little if any research that has studied cold application for less than a minute or explored metal as a delivery method. In this study, 11 college aged males had a thermometer attached to their left cheek. A baseline skin temperature was recorded and eight different substances (Ice pack, stainless steel, commercial cold pack, copper, aluminum, brass, salt-ice pack and an ice cube) were chilled on ice and then applied to their skin, in a randomly selected order, for 60 seconds. After 60 seconds, skin temperature was recorded again and the material was removed. When the skin returned to its baseline temperature the study was repeated with the next material. Ice, with its relatively high melting point, can take advantage of its relatively high heat of fusion to draw the most thermal energy out of tissues in 60 seconds. Based on this study, an ice pack should be used exclusively between rounds of combat sports to minimize the swelling of facial injuries.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 13th, 3:00 PM Apr 13th, 4:00 PM

One More Round: The Best Materials for Cooling the Face in 60 Seconds or Less

UC Ballroom

Facial swelling is a common cause for the termination of boxing and mixed martial arts contests. Currently, facial swelling is treated between rounds by applying pressure with a piece of steel, which has been kept on ice, for approximately 45 seconds. Many studies have been conducted to determine the most effective application of cold to reduce swelling in a clinical setting but there has been little if any research that has studied cold application for less than a minute or explored metal as a delivery method. In this study, 11 college aged males had a thermometer attached to their left cheek. A baseline skin temperature was recorded and eight different substances (Ice pack, stainless steel, commercial cold pack, copper, aluminum, brass, salt-ice pack and an ice cube) were chilled on ice and then applied to their skin, in a randomly selected order, for 60 seconds. After 60 seconds, skin temperature was recorded again and the material was removed. When the skin returned to its baseline temperature the study was repeated with the next material. Ice, with its relatively high melting point, can take advantage of its relatively high heat of fusion to draw the most thermal energy out of tissues in 60 seconds. Based on this study, an ice pack should be used exclusively between rounds of combat sports to minimize the swelling of facial injuries.