Title

Breast Cancer Enzyme CYP1B1 Polymorphisms in Salish Kootenai Ethnicities

Presenter Information

Alex Willoughby

Presentation Type

Poster

Abstract

Metabolic enzymes are important in determining the effectiveness of a medication because they can either activate or deactivate the drug. However, enzymatic activity varies amongst individuals due to differences in genetic makeup. Pharmacogenetics, a branch of research that investigates how effective a drug is based on an individual’s genetic makeup, has been applied to some but not all ethnicities. The Salish Kootenai tribe of western Montana is one such group. My study focuses on establishing the variant frequencies in a specific DNA segment that codes for an enzyme (cytochrome P450-CYP1B1), which hydroxylates chemicals correlated to breast cancer. Salish Kootenai blood samples were tested in a three-step procedure consisting of polymerase chain reaction (PCR), a digest using the Acu1 enzyme, and gel electrophoresis. The results of this analysis showed the frequencies at which homozygous wild type, heterozygous, and homozygous variants occurred across the population. This data will determine the proportion of the Salish Kootenai population with an active CYP1B1 enzyme and non-active CYP1B1 enzyme. Clinically applied, physicians will be able to tailor prescriptions with the highest chance of success to individual breast cancer patients based on that patient’s particular CYP1B1 activity.

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Apr 13th, 3:00 PM Apr 13th, 4:00 PM

Breast Cancer Enzyme CYP1B1 Polymorphisms in Salish Kootenai Ethnicities

UC Ballroom

Metabolic enzymes are important in determining the effectiveness of a medication because they can either activate or deactivate the drug. However, enzymatic activity varies amongst individuals due to differences in genetic makeup. Pharmacogenetics, a branch of research that investigates how effective a drug is based on an individual’s genetic makeup, has been applied to some but not all ethnicities. The Salish Kootenai tribe of western Montana is one such group. My study focuses on establishing the variant frequencies in a specific DNA segment that codes for an enzyme (cytochrome P450-CYP1B1), which hydroxylates chemicals correlated to breast cancer. Salish Kootenai blood samples were tested in a three-step procedure consisting of polymerase chain reaction (PCR), a digest using the Acu1 enzyme, and gel electrophoresis. The results of this analysis showed the frequencies at which homozygous wild type, heterozygous, and homozygous variants occurred across the population. This data will determine the proportion of the Salish Kootenai population with an active CYP1B1 enzyme and non-active CYP1B1 enzyme. Clinically applied, physicians will be able to tailor prescriptions with the highest chance of success to individual breast cancer patients based on that patient’s particular CYP1B1 activity.