Title

Cancer Pharmacogenetics in the Salish-Kootenai Tribe

Presenter Information

Bradley Lerud

Presentation Type

Poster

Abstract

Over the past two decades, a growing focus on the relationship between the CYP1A1 locus and cancer has allowed significant progress in understanding how to better treat cancer patients. Cytochrome P450 is a large group of enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of substances within the body, and CYP1A1 is one of these many enzymes. Through the use of pharmacogenetics, the process of determining more effective treatment drugs to use based on the genetic make-up of an individual, we have analyzed the CYP1A1 enzyme and determined if it would be predicted to work properly in metabolizing a certain cancer treatment in a Montana native population. It is understood that the CYP1A1 enzyme activates the drug Erlotinib (ERL), which is used to slow cancerous cellular growth throughout the body, but with polymorphisms in the coding sequence for this enzyme, the drug likely is unable to do its intended job. Previous research has determined the frequencies of variant DNA sequences on the CYP1A1 locus for many ethnic populations so far, but never for the Salish-Kootenai tribal population of Montana. Through the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and gel electrophoresis, we have determined the frequency of a certain variant on the CYP1A1 locus, specifically the ?m1? variant, to be 50%. Comparing the frequency of this variant to the previously known Caucasian population will allow us to assess the risk of using Erlotinib in this population versus the clinical experience in other ethnic groups. This will aid physicians in choosing an appropriate dose and perhaps alternative drugs for many cancer patients.

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Apr 13th, 3:00 PM Apr 13th, 4:00 PM

Cancer Pharmacogenetics in the Salish-Kootenai Tribe

UC Ballroom

Over the past two decades, a growing focus on the relationship between the CYP1A1 locus and cancer has allowed significant progress in understanding how to better treat cancer patients. Cytochrome P450 is a large group of enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of substances within the body, and CYP1A1 is one of these many enzymes. Through the use of pharmacogenetics, the process of determining more effective treatment drugs to use based on the genetic make-up of an individual, we have analyzed the CYP1A1 enzyme and determined if it would be predicted to work properly in metabolizing a certain cancer treatment in a Montana native population. It is understood that the CYP1A1 enzyme activates the drug Erlotinib (ERL), which is used to slow cancerous cellular growth throughout the body, but with polymorphisms in the coding sequence for this enzyme, the drug likely is unable to do its intended job. Previous research has determined the frequencies of variant DNA sequences on the CYP1A1 locus for many ethnic populations so far, but never for the Salish-Kootenai tribal population of Montana. Through the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and gel electrophoresis, we have determined the frequency of a certain variant on the CYP1A1 locus, specifically the ?m1? variant, to be 50%. Comparing the frequency of this variant to the previously known Caucasian population will allow us to assess the risk of using Erlotinib in this population versus the clinical experience in other ethnic groups. This will aid physicians in choosing an appropriate dose and perhaps alternative drugs for many cancer patients.