Title

Exploring the Effects of Moist Heat Pack on Vertical Jump Performance

Presenter Information

Alyssa Frei
Rebekah Truitt

Presentation Type

Poster

Abstract

Purpose: Studies have shown that active and passive warm-up are both beneficial in increasing muscle temperature and therefore increasing performance. Active warm-up is increasing body temperature through movement, such as running or jogging. Passive warm-up is increasing body temperature through outside means, such as massage or hot pack. The purpose of our study was to provide further insight on passive warm-up and whether using a heat pack prior to performance is beneficial for an athlete when the goal is to improve performance. Originality: Currently, there is little research regarding the effects of the heat pack on sport performance, specifically the vertical jump. Methods: We had 23 subjects volunteer for this study. These subjects did not have an injury to the lower extremity in the past year and were randomly assigned into the control group or heat pack group. With no warm up, subjects completed three trials of a single leg vertical jump on the Just Jump Mat using their dominant leg. Afterwards, subjects received heat pack for 20 minutes on both their calves or rested on a treatment table for 20 minutes. Three jumps of single leg vertical jump with dominant leg were performed again after the treatment. Averages of both pre and post vertical jump performances were taken. Significance: Results showed about an inch decrease in vertical jump performance from pre to post for the subjects that did the hot pack treatment. Those who were in the control group had no change in performance. The use of superficial heat may not recommended when the goal is to improve performance because it may create a sedation effect on the patient because according to Draper, heat provides an analgesic effect to the muscles, which causes relaxation. The point of warm-up is to increase performance, not decrease it.

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Apr 13th, 3:00 PM Apr 13th, 4:00 PM

Exploring the Effects of Moist Heat Pack on Vertical Jump Performance

UC Ballroom

Purpose: Studies have shown that active and passive warm-up are both beneficial in increasing muscle temperature and therefore increasing performance. Active warm-up is increasing body temperature through movement, such as running or jogging. Passive warm-up is increasing body temperature through outside means, such as massage or hot pack. The purpose of our study was to provide further insight on passive warm-up and whether using a heat pack prior to performance is beneficial for an athlete when the goal is to improve performance. Originality: Currently, there is little research regarding the effects of the heat pack on sport performance, specifically the vertical jump. Methods: We had 23 subjects volunteer for this study. These subjects did not have an injury to the lower extremity in the past year and were randomly assigned into the control group or heat pack group. With no warm up, subjects completed three trials of a single leg vertical jump on the Just Jump Mat using their dominant leg. Afterwards, subjects received heat pack for 20 minutes on both their calves or rested on a treatment table for 20 minutes. Three jumps of single leg vertical jump with dominant leg were performed again after the treatment. Averages of both pre and post vertical jump performances were taken. Significance: Results showed about an inch decrease in vertical jump performance from pre to post for the subjects that did the hot pack treatment. Those who were in the control group had no change in performance. The use of superficial heat may not recommended when the goal is to improve performance because it may create a sedation effect on the patient because according to Draper, heat provides an analgesic effect to the muscles, which causes relaxation. The point of warm-up is to increase performance, not decrease it.