Title

Keynote: Prayer, Guns, and Civil Rights: How to Craft New Research Questions

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

At first glance, prayer, guns, and civil rights don’t seem to go together. Little would appear to connect religion, weapons, and social movements. Yet this talk will explain the connections among the three and show how those connections reveal practical lessons about how to craft new research questions. Students in the hard sciences, humanities, social sciences, business, and other disciplines where research remains central will discover the importance of building sand piles, mapping mentalities, and sorting socks (among other engaging insights) in creating knowledge of the world around us. Rather than a dry and intimidating process, research can become a creative, energizing, and collaborative project, one that undergraduate students can contribute to in real and measurable ways. Based on a study of how one researcher came to compare public prayer by civil rights activists and the public presentation of guns by black power advocates, the talk promises to inform and excite about the invigorating challenge of research in any discipline.

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Apr 13th, 12:20 PM Apr 13th, 1:30 PM

Keynote: Prayer, Guns, and Civil Rights: How to Craft New Research Questions

UC Theater

At first glance, prayer, guns, and civil rights don’t seem to go together. Little would appear to connect religion, weapons, and social movements. Yet this talk will explain the connections among the three and show how those connections reveal practical lessons about how to craft new research questions. Students in the hard sciences, humanities, social sciences, business, and other disciplines where research remains central will discover the importance of building sand piles, mapping mentalities, and sorting socks (among other engaging insights) in creating knowledge of the world around us. Rather than a dry and intimidating process, research can become a creative, energizing, and collaborative project, one that undergraduate students can contribute to in real and measurable ways. Based on a study of how one researcher came to compare public prayer by civil rights activists and the public presentation of guns by black power advocates, the talk promises to inform and excite about the invigorating challenge of research in any discipline.