Title

Exploring the Variation of Mood States and Coping Strategies in Athletic Training Students

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

Athletic Training Programs (ATPs) are rigorous and demanding, sometimes effecting athletic training students’ (ATS) quality of life. Use of unhealthy coping further decreases life quality. Understanding ATS coping strategies during elevated stress periods helps with determining healthy, safe coping strategies. This information can help ATP educators structure program content and clinical rotations. To gather this information, this study examines ATS mood state changes and coping while completing an ATP. 17 undergraduate ATS participated in this study. The Profile of Mood States (POMS) is a 65-item questionnaire, measuring mood states on a 5-level scale: not at all, a little, moderately, quite a bit, and extremely. POMS scores 6 mood states: tension-anxiety, depression-dejection, anger-hostility, fatigue-inertia, confusion-bewilderment, and vigor-activity. The Brief COPE questionnaire consists of 28 questions on stress coping strategies. This measures on a 4-point scale, one signifying the practice never occurs, and 4 showing the student uses the strategy often. COPE illustrates stress management through: self-distraction, active coping, denial, substance use, emotional support, instrumental support, behavioral disengagement, venting, positive reframing, planning, humor, acceptance, religion, or self-blame. Questionnaires were completed in September, October, December, and February. Mean POMS scores reflect increased tension-anxiety, depression-dejection, anger-hostility, fatigue-inertia, confusion-bewilderment and total mood disturbance mid-semester. Throughout the semester, vigor-activity decreased. Mean COPE scores show acceptance, planning, positive reframing, emotional support, active coping and self-distraction strategies to manage stress. Substance abuse, self-blame, venting, and denial strategies were rare. Being an ATS is stressful due to long hours, clinical rotations, classes, and limited personal time. Our results suggest throughout the semester anger, depression and fatigue replaces vigor. This affects ATS personally and their professional care of patients. ATS in this study demonstrate various coping strategies such as emotional support and self-distraction to manage stressors. If applied, these findings could improve ATS lives and help them handle program stressors.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 12th, 9:00 AM Apr 12th, 9:20 AM

Exploring the Variation of Mood States and Coping Strategies in Athletic Training Students

UC 331

Athletic Training Programs (ATPs) are rigorous and demanding, sometimes effecting athletic training students’ (ATS) quality of life. Use of unhealthy coping further decreases life quality. Understanding ATS coping strategies during elevated stress periods helps with determining healthy, safe coping strategies. This information can help ATP educators structure program content and clinical rotations. To gather this information, this study examines ATS mood state changes and coping while completing an ATP. 17 undergraduate ATS participated in this study. The Profile of Mood States (POMS) is a 65-item questionnaire, measuring mood states on a 5-level scale: not at all, a little, moderately, quite a bit, and extremely. POMS scores 6 mood states: tension-anxiety, depression-dejection, anger-hostility, fatigue-inertia, confusion-bewilderment, and vigor-activity. The Brief COPE questionnaire consists of 28 questions on stress coping strategies. This measures on a 4-point scale, one signifying the practice never occurs, and 4 showing the student uses the strategy often. COPE illustrates stress management through: self-distraction, active coping, denial, substance use, emotional support, instrumental support, behavioral disengagement, venting, positive reframing, planning, humor, acceptance, religion, or self-blame. Questionnaires were completed in September, October, December, and February. Mean POMS scores reflect increased tension-anxiety, depression-dejection, anger-hostility, fatigue-inertia, confusion-bewilderment and total mood disturbance mid-semester. Throughout the semester, vigor-activity decreased. Mean COPE scores show acceptance, planning, positive reframing, emotional support, active coping and self-distraction strategies to manage stress. Substance abuse, self-blame, venting, and denial strategies were rare. Being an ATS is stressful due to long hours, clinical rotations, classes, and limited personal time. Our results suggest throughout the semester anger, depression and fatigue replaces vigor. This affects ATS personally and their professional care of patients. ATS in this study demonstrate various coping strategies such as emotional support and self-distraction to manage stressors. If applied, these findings could improve ATS lives and help them handle program stressors.