Title

The Struggles of International Research in a Developing Country: A Study on Diabetes Prevalence Rates in the Rural Arumeru District of Tanzania

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Presentation

Abstract

International research is plagued with various struggles, the main being obtaining permissions to conduct such research. Permissions from people such as an Ethics Review Committee along with governmental clearance are required to proceed. Upon leaving the boarders of the United States of America, a researcher must not only obtain these permissions, but also respect the local requirements of the country that the research project is being conducted in. Once permission is obtained, the fate of the research project is ultimately left up to the discretion of the host. Selection of a host is vital, for they are ultimately responsible for facilitating the travel as well as providing participants to conduct a study on. The host can also make obtaining previously discussed permissions easier through locally acceptable routes. The next struggle is the language barrier and obtaining competent translators to work to conquer this barrier. Developing countries have limited resources and supplies. Once the researcher runs out of materials, he/she is usually finished. One has to plan ahead to obtain needed materials before starting the project. Some scientific methods, such as true randomization, are not possible due to inability to travel to desired locations. The ability to see the overall project and alter the experiment's protocol to adapt to the conditions provided by the hose is rarely encountered in research within the United States of America. An international researcher needs to be able to think rapidly and adapt to create a successful project while keeping the variables limited; no matter what struggles present themselves. This novel methodology outlines basic struggles on how to conduct and adapt to the struggles of international research in a developing country. This is done utilizing a case study on the prevalence rates of diabetes and pre-diabetes in rural villages of the Arumeru District of Tanzanian.

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Apr 12th, 3:20 PM Apr 12th, 3:40 PM

The Struggles of International Research in a Developing Country: A Study on Diabetes Prevalence Rates in the Rural Arumeru District of Tanzania

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International research is plagued with various struggles, the main being obtaining permissions to conduct such research. Permissions from people such as an Ethics Review Committee along with governmental clearance are required to proceed. Upon leaving the boarders of the United States of America, a researcher must not only obtain these permissions, but also respect the local requirements of the country that the research project is being conducted in. Once permission is obtained, the fate of the research project is ultimately left up to the discretion of the host. Selection of a host is vital, for they are ultimately responsible for facilitating the travel as well as providing participants to conduct a study on. The host can also make obtaining previously discussed permissions easier through locally acceptable routes. The next struggle is the language barrier and obtaining competent translators to work to conquer this barrier. Developing countries have limited resources and supplies. Once the researcher runs out of materials, he/she is usually finished. One has to plan ahead to obtain needed materials before starting the project. Some scientific methods, such as true randomization, are not possible due to inability to travel to desired locations. The ability to see the overall project and alter the experiment's protocol to adapt to the conditions provided by the hose is rarely encountered in research within the United States of America. An international researcher needs to be able to think rapidly and adapt to create a successful project while keeping the variables limited; no matter what struggles present themselves. This novel methodology outlines basic struggles on how to conduct and adapt to the struggles of international research in a developing country. This is done utilizing a case study on the prevalence rates of diabetes and pre-diabetes in rural villages of the Arumeru District of Tanzanian.