Title

Assessing Maladaptive Responses Through the Use of Follow-up Questions to Counter Attempts to "Fake Good"

Presentation Type

Poster

Abstract

Previous research has shown that abusive parents tend to overestimate their young children’s competence and use relatively maladaptive parental practices even when not engaging in abuse. The Child Guidance Interview (CGI) is being developed to identify such beliefs and practices in order to distinguish child abusers from non-abusers. The CGI is an open-ended interview in which hypothetical child guidance scenarios are presented and parents must propose responses. One feature is the use of follow-up questions intended to encourage parents to respond outside of their “comfort zones” and to reduce the likelihood of “faking good.” Parents are asked how they would respond initially and then what they would do if the initial responses were ineffective. We examined four developmental norm scenarios (potty training, bathtub safety, dinner manners, and need for a comfort blanket) and one disobedience scenario (store tantrum). Data from 76 parents (archival clinical and volunteer participants) were coded as superior, satisfactory, or unsatisfactory using manuals developed by previous members of this team. Successive responses to follow-up questions were compared to determined whether follow up questions increase the likelihood of eliciting maladaptive responses.

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Apr 12th, 11:00 AM Apr 12th, 12:00 PM

Assessing Maladaptive Responses Through the Use of Follow-up Questions to Counter Attempts to "Fake Good"

UC Ballroom

Previous research has shown that abusive parents tend to overestimate their young children’s competence and use relatively maladaptive parental practices even when not engaging in abuse. The Child Guidance Interview (CGI) is being developed to identify such beliefs and practices in order to distinguish child abusers from non-abusers. The CGI is an open-ended interview in which hypothetical child guidance scenarios are presented and parents must propose responses. One feature is the use of follow-up questions intended to encourage parents to respond outside of their “comfort zones” and to reduce the likelihood of “faking good.” Parents are asked how they would respond initially and then what they would do if the initial responses were ineffective. We examined four developmental norm scenarios (potty training, bathtub safety, dinner manners, and need for a comfort blanket) and one disobedience scenario (store tantrum). Data from 76 parents (archival clinical and volunteer participants) were coded as superior, satisfactory, or unsatisfactory using manuals developed by previous members of this team. Successive responses to follow-up questions were compared to determined whether follow up questions increase the likelihood of eliciting maladaptive responses.