Presentation Type

Poster

Abstract

Background: Fibromyalgia is a chronic widespread pain disorder of neuroendocrine/neurotransmitter deregulation that amplifies pain experiences. Physical exertion that comes with normal daily routines exacerbates symptoms, causing fear of participation. Complimentary or alternative medicine (CAM) includes massage, acupuncture, chiropractic, yoga, tai chi and cognitive behavior therapy. The purpose of this study was to predict the use of CAM from pain interference and pain intensity of community dwelling people with fibromyalgia.

Methods: Research participants were 73 individuals randomly recruited from five zip codes in Missoula who reported being diagnosed with fibromyalgia. They completed a mail based survey from a larger study on pain and participation. We used logistic regression analysis to examine the hypothesized relationships between variables.

Results: These cross sectional results show that CAM was used by 69.9% of the fibromyalgia participants and that pain interference was a significant predictor of CAM use. The odds ratio adjusted for age, gender and income indicated that for each unit increase in pain interference (range 9-45) there was an 8.7% increase in the likelihood that people used CAM. The model accounted for 36.8% of the variance in the use of CAM.

Conclusion: The findings indicate that as interference in daily activities from pain increases the use of CAM is more likely. Further research might investigate the effectiveness of various CAM for use with fibromyalgia.

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Apr 12th, 11:00 AM Apr 12th, 12:00 PM

Effects of pain interference on use of complementary therapy in fibromyalgia

UC Ballroom

Background: Fibromyalgia is a chronic widespread pain disorder of neuroendocrine/neurotransmitter deregulation that amplifies pain experiences. Physical exertion that comes with normal daily routines exacerbates symptoms, causing fear of participation. Complimentary or alternative medicine (CAM) includes massage, acupuncture, chiropractic, yoga, tai chi and cognitive behavior therapy. The purpose of this study was to predict the use of CAM from pain interference and pain intensity of community dwelling people with fibromyalgia.

Methods: Research participants were 73 individuals randomly recruited from five zip codes in Missoula who reported being diagnosed with fibromyalgia. They completed a mail based survey from a larger study on pain and participation. We used logistic regression analysis to examine the hypothesized relationships between variables.

Results: These cross sectional results show that CAM was used by 69.9% of the fibromyalgia participants and that pain interference was a significant predictor of CAM use. The odds ratio adjusted for age, gender and income indicated that for each unit increase in pain interference (range 9-45) there was an 8.7% increase in the likelihood that people used CAM. The model accounted for 36.8% of the variance in the use of CAM.

Conclusion: The findings indicate that as interference in daily activities from pain increases the use of CAM is more likely. Further research might investigate the effectiveness of various CAM for use with fibromyalgia.