Title

Skin temperature decreases during maximal running in compensable environments

Presentation Type

Poster

Abstract

PURPOSE: Evaluate relationships between skin temperature, heart rate and core temperature during increases in interval running intensity. Specifically, the relationship between skin temperature and increased running speed was examined. METHODS: Study participants included 7 males and 3 females (22.9 ± 2.5 years, 177.9 ± 9.0 cm, 79.7 ± 13.9 kg, 25.1 ± 3.0 body mass index, 13.3 ± 5.8 % body fat, and 53.3 ± 8.3 VO2 ml/kg/min). Subjects completed a 75 minute trial, alternating between 10 minute run intervals (60, 70, 80, 90, and 100% of age-predicted heart rate max) and 5 minutes of walking between each interval. The trials were conducted on an outdoor 440 yard track with ambient temperatures ranging between 13-30°C. Heart rate, skin temperature, and rectal temperatures were monitored throughout the trials using wireless units. RESULTS: Skin temperature was lower during the 100% stage (running and walking temperatures averaged), compared to the 60, 70, 80, and 90% stages, main effect of time (32.8 ± 2.5 vs. 34.7 ± 1.5, 34.7 ± 1.6, 34.9 ± 1.3, 34.4 ± 1.5°C, respectively, p<0.05). Skin temperature was lower during the 90% stage compared to the 80% stage (p<0.05), and there was a trend for 90% being lower than 70% (p=0.07). Rectal temperature and heart rate showed increases throughout the protocol at all time points, main effect for time, p<0.05. CONCLUSION: During maximal running, a decrease in skin temperature was observed compared to submaximal intensities. The likely explanation for this is the increased convection from running faster, as well as the redistribution of blood flow to the working muscles. These findings suggest that maximal running results in a larger gradient for the body to dissipate excess heat across.

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Apr 12th, 11:00 AM Apr 12th, 12:00 PM

Skin temperature decreases during maximal running in compensable environments

UC Ballroom

PURPOSE: Evaluate relationships between skin temperature, heart rate and core temperature during increases in interval running intensity. Specifically, the relationship between skin temperature and increased running speed was examined. METHODS: Study participants included 7 males and 3 females (22.9 ± 2.5 years, 177.9 ± 9.0 cm, 79.7 ± 13.9 kg, 25.1 ± 3.0 body mass index, 13.3 ± 5.8 % body fat, and 53.3 ± 8.3 VO2 ml/kg/min). Subjects completed a 75 minute trial, alternating between 10 minute run intervals (60, 70, 80, 90, and 100% of age-predicted heart rate max) and 5 minutes of walking between each interval. The trials were conducted on an outdoor 440 yard track with ambient temperatures ranging between 13-30°C. Heart rate, skin temperature, and rectal temperatures were monitored throughout the trials using wireless units. RESULTS: Skin temperature was lower during the 100% stage (running and walking temperatures averaged), compared to the 60, 70, 80, and 90% stages, main effect of time (32.8 ± 2.5 vs. 34.7 ± 1.5, 34.7 ± 1.6, 34.9 ± 1.3, 34.4 ± 1.5°C, respectively, p<0.05). Skin temperature was lower during the 90% stage compared to the 80% stage (p<0.05), and there was a trend for 90% being lower than 70% (p=0.07). Rectal temperature and heart rate showed increases throughout the protocol at all time points, main effect for time, p<0.05. CONCLUSION: During maximal running, a decrease in skin temperature was observed compared to submaximal intensities. The likely explanation for this is the increased convection from running faster, as well as the redistribution of blood flow to the working muscles. These findings suggest that maximal running results in a larger gradient for the body to dissipate excess heat across.