Title

Exploring the Effects of Moist Heat Pack Duration on Shoulder Range of Motion

Presentation Type

Poster

Abstract

Moist heat packs are commonly used by athletes prior to activity to increase superficial circulation, metabolism, and range of motion in specific muscle groups. Research indicates that moist heat packs must be applied for 30 minutes to raise tissue temperature at a depth of 1-2 centimeters. From a practical standpoint, it is widely known that the average treatment time for a moist heat pack is 15-20 minutes. Little research has explained the variability in duration of moist heat pack application and its potential impact on range of motion. The purpose of this study was to examine three different trials of moist heat pack application with varying times to determine its effect on shoulder range of motion. A convenience sample included 6 participants, 3 males and 3 females. They were all college aged, physically active, healthy individuals that had no previous injuries with their dominant shoulder. Each subject completed three durations of moist heat pack application to their dominant shoulder (10, 15, 20 minutes) within one week and 24 hours between each trial. Shoulder range of motion was measured before and after each trial. A 2x3 repeated measures ANOVA revealed no significance for increased shoulder external rotation (p=0.330), for horizontal adduction (p=0.940), internal rotation (p=0.090) or flexion (p=0.271). However, there was a main effect for time (p=0.04) for external rotation. It also revealed the range of motion of all groups decreased regardless of heat pack duration. The results from this study indicate that treatment times of 10-20 minutes are insufficient to increase range of motion. Greater treatment times (30 minutes) attain one to two centimeters of heating with superficial agents, this might affect ROM. Further research is necessary to determine appropriate treatment parameters of moist heat pack application when the clinical goal is to increase range of motion.

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Apr 12th, 11:00 AM Apr 12th, 12:00 PM

Exploring the Effects of Moist Heat Pack Duration on Shoulder Range of Motion

UC Ballroom

Moist heat packs are commonly used by athletes prior to activity to increase superficial circulation, metabolism, and range of motion in specific muscle groups. Research indicates that moist heat packs must be applied for 30 minutes to raise tissue temperature at a depth of 1-2 centimeters. From a practical standpoint, it is widely known that the average treatment time for a moist heat pack is 15-20 minutes. Little research has explained the variability in duration of moist heat pack application and its potential impact on range of motion. The purpose of this study was to examine three different trials of moist heat pack application with varying times to determine its effect on shoulder range of motion. A convenience sample included 6 participants, 3 males and 3 females. They were all college aged, physically active, healthy individuals that had no previous injuries with their dominant shoulder. Each subject completed three durations of moist heat pack application to their dominant shoulder (10, 15, 20 minutes) within one week and 24 hours between each trial. Shoulder range of motion was measured before and after each trial. A 2x3 repeated measures ANOVA revealed no significance for increased shoulder external rotation (p=0.330), for horizontal adduction (p=0.940), internal rotation (p=0.090) or flexion (p=0.271). However, there was a main effect for time (p=0.04) for external rotation. It also revealed the range of motion of all groups decreased regardless of heat pack duration. The results from this study indicate that treatment times of 10-20 minutes are insufficient to increase range of motion. Greater treatment times (30 minutes) attain one to two centimeters of heating with superficial agents, this might affect ROM. Further research is necessary to determine appropriate treatment parameters of moist heat pack application when the clinical goal is to increase range of motion.