Title

In Vitro Exposure to US Southwestern Sand Dust and its Effect in Respiratory Health

Presentation Type

Poster

Abstract

Much of the American Southwest comprises of desert, where about 12 million people live. Population increase and global climate change will cause drastic changes over the next 20 years, expanding the desert, causing larger, more frequent, and more severe sand dust storms. Airborne particulate matter is known to have health consequences within the respiratory system. Studies regarding the effects of Asian sand dust found an increase in hospital visits for respiratory associated distress. Additional evidence suggests dust storms increase inflammation and allergic airway responses in murine models. Black Rock Desert in Nevada is known to have large dust storms. Each year 50,000 people gather together for one week in this desert for an event called Burning Man. It takes place on the playa and frequent dust-storm make it an excellent environment for studying their negative health impacts. The composition of the sand dust is around 50% SiO2, with the second and third most common compounds being Al2O3 and Fe2O3 respectively. The high level of silicate material in the dust is of concern due to the known detrimental effects within lung tissue, particularly when combined with bacteria and/or its components. An in vitro model would provide useful information of the type and severity of inflammatory response induced by the inhalation of SW sand dust particles.

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Apr 12th, 3:00 PM Apr 12th, 4:00 PM

In Vitro Exposure to US Southwestern Sand Dust and its Effect in Respiratory Health

UC Ballroom

Much of the American Southwest comprises of desert, where about 12 million people live. Population increase and global climate change will cause drastic changes over the next 20 years, expanding the desert, causing larger, more frequent, and more severe sand dust storms. Airborne particulate matter is known to have health consequences within the respiratory system. Studies regarding the effects of Asian sand dust found an increase in hospital visits for respiratory associated distress. Additional evidence suggests dust storms increase inflammation and allergic airway responses in murine models. Black Rock Desert in Nevada is known to have large dust storms. Each year 50,000 people gather together for one week in this desert for an event called Burning Man. It takes place on the playa and frequent dust-storm make it an excellent environment for studying their negative health impacts. The composition of the sand dust is around 50% SiO2, with the second and third most common compounds being Al2O3 and Fe2O3 respectively. The high level of silicate material in the dust is of concern due to the known detrimental effects within lung tissue, particularly when combined with bacteria and/or its components. An in vitro model would provide useful information of the type and severity of inflammatory response induced by the inhalation of SW sand dust particles.