Title

Simulated traumatic brain injury: No relationship between self-ratings of success, objective measurement, and time spent preparing

Presentation Type

Poster

Abstract

A traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a brain pathology caused by external force that may affect cognitive function and personality. Symptoms of a TBI are sometimes imitated by people who are motivated by an incentive such as insurance money. Neuropsychologists use assessments to differentiate between those who are suffering from the symptoms of a TBI from those who are faking. One of these examinations is the Computerized Assessment of Response Bias (CARB), which is designed to identify those who are giving poor effort, indicative of faking symptoms. The subjects in this study were 24 psychology 100 students from the University of Montana. The subjects in this study were told to simulate a TBI and were asked to prepare for the role outside the lab, using any resource. The participants were asked to take a series of neuropsychological tests, including the CARB, and to fill out a post-experimental questionnaire which included rating how successful the participants thought they were in producing the results asked of them and estimating how long they prepared for the role.

It was found that 94% if the participants who rated themselves as successful in simulating a TBI were identified as giving poor effort on the CARB, indicative of faking a TBI. This data indicates that there is no relationship between self-rating of TBI simulation and success of simulation as measured by the CARB. Additionally, it was found that the participants spent an average of 24.9 minutes preparing for the role of TBI simulation. No relationship was found between time spent preparing and either the self-rating of success or performance on the CARB. This data indicates that college students are not successful in gathering and using information relevant to TBI simulation and that the students are not accurate in assessing the quality of their simulation.

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Apr 12th, 3:00 PM Apr 12th, 4:00 PM

Simulated traumatic brain injury: No relationship between self-ratings of success, objective measurement, and time spent preparing

UC Ballroom

A traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a brain pathology caused by external force that may affect cognitive function and personality. Symptoms of a TBI are sometimes imitated by people who are motivated by an incentive such as insurance money. Neuropsychologists use assessments to differentiate between those who are suffering from the symptoms of a TBI from those who are faking. One of these examinations is the Computerized Assessment of Response Bias (CARB), which is designed to identify those who are giving poor effort, indicative of faking symptoms. The subjects in this study were 24 psychology 100 students from the University of Montana. The subjects in this study were told to simulate a TBI and were asked to prepare for the role outside the lab, using any resource. The participants were asked to take a series of neuropsychological tests, including the CARB, and to fill out a post-experimental questionnaire which included rating how successful the participants thought they were in producing the results asked of them and estimating how long they prepared for the role.

It was found that 94% if the participants who rated themselves as successful in simulating a TBI were identified as giving poor effort on the CARB, indicative of faking a TBI. This data indicates that there is no relationship between self-rating of TBI simulation and success of simulation as measured by the CARB. Additionally, it was found that the participants spent an average of 24.9 minutes preparing for the role of TBI simulation. No relationship was found between time spent preparing and either the self-rating of success or performance on the CARB. This data indicates that college students are not successful in gathering and using information relevant to TBI simulation and that the students are not accurate in assessing the quality of their simulation.