Title

The Effect of Dosage on Speech Sound Disorder Therapy

Presentation Type

Poster

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to measure the dosage of therapy for speech sound disorders. Children with speech sound disorders have problems saying certain speech sounds. Dosage is the total amount of therapy provided and it can be broken down into five specific parts: dose, dose form, dose frequency, total intervention duration, and cumulative intervention intensity. This project looked specifically at dose, the number of teaching episodes per treatment session. This research is significant because findings from a literature review showed a lack of research pertaining to the collection of dosage data. We designed an original method to collect dose in treatment therapy sessions. For the methodology, we observed 16 therapy sessions of a 6-year-old boy with a severe speech sound disorder. For each treatment session, data related to dose were collected by tallying the number of clinician prompts and child responses. These data were analyzed to find relationships between assessments (given pre-treatment, mid-treatment, and post-treatment) and the amount of dosage. Results regarding the relationships and future implications for speech-language pathologists in practice will be discussed. We believe this research will be a stepping-stone for future research endeavors because speech-language pathologists will have a better understanding of how much dosage is needed for efficient and effective treatment of speech-sound disorders.

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Apr 12th, 3:00 PM Apr 12th, 4:00 PM

The Effect of Dosage on Speech Sound Disorder Therapy

UC Ballroom

The purpose of this study was to measure the dosage of therapy for speech sound disorders. Children with speech sound disorders have problems saying certain speech sounds. Dosage is the total amount of therapy provided and it can be broken down into five specific parts: dose, dose form, dose frequency, total intervention duration, and cumulative intervention intensity. This project looked specifically at dose, the number of teaching episodes per treatment session. This research is significant because findings from a literature review showed a lack of research pertaining to the collection of dosage data. We designed an original method to collect dose in treatment therapy sessions. For the methodology, we observed 16 therapy sessions of a 6-year-old boy with a severe speech sound disorder. For each treatment session, data related to dose were collected by tallying the number of clinician prompts and child responses. These data were analyzed to find relationships between assessments (given pre-treatment, mid-treatment, and post-treatment) and the amount of dosage. Results regarding the relationships and future implications for speech-language pathologists in practice will be discussed. We believe this research will be a stepping-stone for future research endeavors because speech-language pathologists will have a better understanding of how much dosage is needed for efficient and effective treatment of speech-sound disorders.