Title

Can't Get No Job Satisfaction: Setting as an Indicator of Current and Desired Roles of School Psychologists

Presentation Type

Poster

Abstract

Children in rural areas face greater academic, mental health, and behavioral difficulties than children in urban areas (Lenardson et al., 2010; Moore et al., 2005). School psychologists provide support to children in these areas through assessment, intervention, and consultation services (Reschly, 2000). Little research, however, has been done on the roles of school psychologists in rural areas. Current research shows that rural school psychologists face unique challenges including less experience, a lack of resources, and professional isolation (Clopton & Knesting, 2006; McLeskey, et al., 1983). These challenges could reasonably impact job satisfaction, which is one understudied area in rural school psychology. The goal of this research study is to examine differences in job satisfaction between rural, suburban, and urban school psychologists in the Pacific Northwest and Rocky Mountain regions of the United States.

An online survey was completed by 217 school psychologists in rural (n = 94), suburban (n = 94), and urban (n = 29) areas in the Pacific Northwest and Rocky Mountain region. Participants answered demographic questions as well as questions pertaining to their current and desired roles and responsibilities as school psychologists. In this mixed-methods study, quantitative data will be analyzed using Chi-square analyses while qualitative data will be analyzed using thematic coding.

This presentation will increase awareness of the challenges faced by school psychologist in rural areas like Montana. We hope to identify ways that rural school psychologists can increase their job satisfaction and provide more effective academic and mental health services to Montanan children.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 12th, 3:00 PM Apr 12th, 4:00 PM

Can't Get No Job Satisfaction: Setting as an Indicator of Current and Desired Roles of School Psychologists

UC Ballroom

Children in rural areas face greater academic, mental health, and behavioral difficulties than children in urban areas (Lenardson et al., 2010; Moore et al., 2005). School psychologists provide support to children in these areas through assessment, intervention, and consultation services (Reschly, 2000). Little research, however, has been done on the roles of school psychologists in rural areas. Current research shows that rural school psychologists face unique challenges including less experience, a lack of resources, and professional isolation (Clopton & Knesting, 2006; McLeskey, et al., 1983). These challenges could reasonably impact job satisfaction, which is one understudied area in rural school psychology. The goal of this research study is to examine differences in job satisfaction between rural, suburban, and urban school psychologists in the Pacific Northwest and Rocky Mountain regions of the United States.

An online survey was completed by 217 school psychologists in rural (n = 94), suburban (n = 94), and urban (n = 29) areas in the Pacific Northwest and Rocky Mountain region. Participants answered demographic questions as well as questions pertaining to their current and desired roles and responsibilities as school psychologists. In this mixed-methods study, quantitative data will be analyzed using Chi-square analyses while qualitative data will be analyzed using thematic coding.

This presentation will increase awareness of the challenges faced by school psychologist in rural areas like Montana. We hope to identify ways that rural school psychologists can increase their job satisfaction and provide more effective academic and mental health services to Montanan children.