Title

Exploring the Experiences of Transgender College Students

Presentation Type

Poster

Abstract

This study hopes to examine the experiences of students (18 years and older) attending the University of Montana who self-identify as transgender or gender-variant. Though research on this topic is limited, studies have concluded that this community typically lacks support in many aspects of campus life. Findings have voiced concern about a shortage of allies among faculty and staff, not having sufficient access to physical and mental health services, and not having appropriate campus facilities, such as restrooms and locker rooms (Beemyn, 2003; McKinney, 2005). This study aims to build upon current literature by exploring both positive and negative aspects of these students’ experiences. Five research participants are currently being recruited from student and community-based LGBT organizations. After agreeing to participate, individuals will be asked a series of semi-structured interview questions exploring their experiences, including access to appropriate campus facilities, interactions with faculty and students, involvement in the LGBT community, and interactions with the administration. A phenomenological qualitative analysis will be employed to reveal core themes describing the experiences of these students. These findings may aid administrative officials in better understanding the needs of transgender students so they can actively work towards promoting an inclusive campus environment.

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Apr 12th, 3:00 PM Apr 12th, 4:00 PM

Exploring the Experiences of Transgender College Students

UC Ballroom

This study hopes to examine the experiences of students (18 years and older) attending the University of Montana who self-identify as transgender or gender-variant. Though research on this topic is limited, studies have concluded that this community typically lacks support in many aspects of campus life. Findings have voiced concern about a shortage of allies among faculty and staff, not having sufficient access to physical and mental health services, and not having appropriate campus facilities, such as restrooms and locker rooms (Beemyn, 2003; McKinney, 2005). This study aims to build upon current literature by exploring both positive and negative aspects of these students’ experiences. Five research participants are currently being recruited from student and community-based LGBT organizations. After agreeing to participate, individuals will be asked a series of semi-structured interview questions exploring their experiences, including access to appropriate campus facilities, interactions with faculty and students, involvement in the LGBT community, and interactions with the administration. A phenomenological qualitative analysis will be employed to reveal core themes describing the experiences of these students. These findings may aid administrative officials in better understanding the needs of transgender students so they can actively work towards promoting an inclusive campus environment.