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The University of Montana offers a course, Human Sexuality cross-listed with Anthropology and Biology. As a major in Anthropology, I chose this course to gain an ethnographic cross-cultural perspective on human sexuality. In 2011, the course was taught from a health and human performance pedagogy perspective stressing biological knowledge. The cross-cultural comparison focused on different pedophilias in western, primarily U.S. society. Anthropology of human sexuality reflects every aspect of society and culture. How should the pedagogy of this course span different disciplines and integrate biological, cross-cultural, and also legal issues in K-16 sex education? My initial research reveals that college students surveyed do not understand their individual rights in both Titles Seven and Nine Civil Rights Acts; although, they have a broad range of expectations and goals for the scope and nature of human sexuality education and its importance. In 2014, I distributed an anonymous, voluntary survey to ANTY 227 (subjects were numbered). The sample population is demographically representative, drawn from ages 18-60; freshmen to seniors, and numerous majors. Of 148 students enrolled, 65 volunteered to complete the survey. My aim is to describe the changes, if any, in their opinions or knowledge about human sexuality, by repeating the survey in ten weeks. Based on comparative results of student opinions and knowledge, especially of the Civil Rights Acts, I will both describe and evaluate student receptivity for interdisciplinary pedagogy of human sexuality at the University of Montana to include knowledge of legal issues, as well as biological and cross-cultural perspectives.

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Apr 11th, 9:40 AM Apr 11th, 10:00 AM

How Should We Teach Human Sexuality at the University of Montana?

The University of Montana offers a course, Human Sexuality cross-listed with Anthropology and Biology. As a major in Anthropology, I chose this course to gain an ethnographic cross-cultural perspective on human sexuality. In 2011, the course was taught from a health and human performance pedagogy perspective stressing biological knowledge. The cross-cultural comparison focused on different pedophilias in western, primarily U.S. society. Anthropology of human sexuality reflects every aspect of society and culture. How should the pedagogy of this course span different disciplines and integrate biological, cross-cultural, and also legal issues in K-16 sex education? My initial research reveals that college students surveyed do not understand their individual rights in both Titles Seven and Nine Civil Rights Acts; although, they have a broad range of expectations and goals for the scope and nature of human sexuality education and its importance. In 2014, I distributed an anonymous, voluntary survey to ANTY 227 (subjects were numbered). The sample population is demographically representative, drawn from ages 18-60; freshmen to seniors, and numerous majors. Of 148 students enrolled, 65 volunteered to complete the survey. My aim is to describe the changes, if any, in their opinions or knowledge about human sexuality, by repeating the survey in ten weeks. Based on comparative results of student opinions and knowledge, especially of the Civil Rights Acts, I will both describe and evaluate student receptivity for interdisciplinary pedagogy of human sexuality at the University of Montana to include knowledge of legal issues, as well as biological and cross-cultural perspectives.