Presenter Information

Amy R. SiskFollow

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

Only one small grocery store serves the 5,000 people living on the Northern Cheyenne Reservation in rural southeastern Montana. Between its limited stock, fast food from a nearby convenience store and canned goods distributed to residents through the commodity program, it’s hard to come by wholesome meals. That has not stopped health-conscious people from sponsoring a host of programs to curb poor nutrition. But will their efforts go far enough to make a lasting difference across the reservation? And why is accessing quality food so difficult in this part of the state? I set out to answer these questions on a trip to the Northern Cheyenne Reservation over spring break. My research will culminate in a longform story for the University of Montana School of Journalism’s yearly Native News project, slated for publication on May 24 in the Missoulian and Billings Gazette. After dozens of interviews with people working in food- and health-related fields, as well as residents who struggle to find healthy food, I am compiling my notes into an article to be printed alongside other journalism students’ stories of innovation in Montana’s Indian Country.

Category

Social Sciences

Share

COinS
 
Apr 11th, 10:20 AM Apr 11th, 10:40 AM

Where’s the Kale? A Search for Food Security on the Northern Cheyenne Reservation

Only one small grocery store serves the 5,000 people living on the Northern Cheyenne Reservation in rural southeastern Montana. Between its limited stock, fast food from a nearby convenience store and canned goods distributed to residents through the commodity program, it’s hard to come by wholesome meals. That has not stopped health-conscious people from sponsoring a host of programs to curb poor nutrition. But will their efforts go far enough to make a lasting difference across the reservation? And why is accessing quality food so difficult in this part of the state? I set out to answer these questions on a trip to the Northern Cheyenne Reservation over spring break. My research will culminate in a longform story for the University of Montana School of Journalism’s yearly Native News project, slated for publication on May 24 in the Missoulian and Billings Gazette. After dozens of interviews with people working in food- and health-related fields, as well as residents who struggle to find healthy food, I am compiling my notes into an article to be printed alongside other journalism students’ stories of innovation in Montana’s Indian Country.