Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

Theatre, in its very best form, should reveal to us some truth about the human condition. Political theatre takes some of our harshest conditions and realities and forces us to face the ramifications we might otherwise ignore. This project focuses on the work of playwright David Edgar and his own personal “brand” of political theatre. Through a close examination and analysis of his 1995 play Pentecost, I utilize Edgar’s focus on conflicts in Eastern Europe to highlight the importance of political theatre in our world today. As east and west collide, Pentecost showcases the importance of understanding the turmoil that exists in the world around us. Rather than using these stories solely for artistic value, we must view them for what they are: the human experience. In addition to Pentecost, I reference a variety of Edgar’s other works that feature similar conflicts, to further emphasize Pentecost’s main themes. I also look at texts that analyze Edgar’s own political views and how his ideologies have influenced his plays. This approach takes a different look at political theatre as it focuses on the universal impact that more geographically specified material can have. Regardless of location, the intrinsic human experience is an all-encompassing concept, and one that all art, but especially theatre relies on. I examine where the human connections are made, and why political theatre is such an effective vehicle to communicate these realities.

Category

Visual and Performing Arts (including Creative Writing)

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Apr 11th, 3:20 PM Apr 11th, 3:40 PM

David Edgar: Connection in Political Theatre

Theatre, in its very best form, should reveal to us some truth about the human condition. Political theatre takes some of our harshest conditions and realities and forces us to face the ramifications we might otherwise ignore. This project focuses on the work of playwright David Edgar and his own personal “brand” of political theatre. Through a close examination and analysis of his 1995 play Pentecost, I utilize Edgar’s focus on conflicts in Eastern Europe to highlight the importance of political theatre in our world today. As east and west collide, Pentecost showcases the importance of understanding the turmoil that exists in the world around us. Rather than using these stories solely for artistic value, we must view them for what they are: the human experience. In addition to Pentecost, I reference a variety of Edgar’s other works that feature similar conflicts, to further emphasize Pentecost’s main themes. I also look at texts that analyze Edgar’s own political views and how his ideologies have influenced his plays. This approach takes a different look at political theatre as it focuses on the universal impact that more geographically specified material can have. Regardless of location, the intrinsic human experience is an all-encompassing concept, and one that all art, but especially theatre relies on. I examine where the human connections are made, and why political theatre is such an effective vehicle to communicate these realities.