Presentation Type

Poster

Abstract

Physical Activity and Body Composition Measures of Elementary-Aged School Children on an American Indian Reservation

1Kemp, C., 1Schreiner, A., 2Kavanagh, D., and 1Yonts, B.

1Department of Health and Human Performance, Exercise Science, The University of Montana—Missoula; 2Department of Health and Human Performance, Community Health, The University of Montana—Missoula

Childhood obesity and diabetes are major public health concerns. American Indian (AI) children are at increased risk for these diseases. Physical inactivity and high body mass index (BMI) are risk factors for obesity and diabetes. The purpose of this study was to collect body composition measures and physical activity (PA) counts for elementary school-age children on an AI reservation. A total of 61 children (28 males and 33 females) participated in the body composition measures. These included weight, height, and waist circumference—BMI was calculated with the equation weight(kg)/height(m)2 and converted to BMI-for-age percentiles. Physical activity was measured by direct observation. Three sections of the recess playground were designated as zones: Zone 1 was an asphalt area, Zone 2 contained playground structures, and Zone 3 was an open field. Each zone was video recorded for 10 minutes during a recess period for four school days. PA counts were classified as sedentary, walking, or active. The mean BMI-for-age was at the 67th percentile and mean waist circumference was 72.3cm (±11.7cm). The PA data showed girls had more sedentary counts (12.2 ± 3.5) and active counts (8.0 ± 2.1) in Zone 2 compared to Zone 1 (sedentary counts= 2.3 ± 1.3; active counts= 2.7 ± 1.6) or Zone 3 (sedentary counts=0 ± 0; active counts= 0 ± 0). Boys had more sedentary counts (4.7 ± 2.2) and active counts (4.7 ± 2.8) in Zone 2 than either Zone 1 (sedentary counts= 2.4 ± 1.5; active counts= 3.8 ± 2.1) or Zone 3 (sedentary counts= 0.9 ± 1; active counts= 3.8 ± 2.9). These data were the baseline results of a pilot study designed to increase PA during recess in 3rd, 4th, 5th, and 6th grade children in this AI community.

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Physical Sciences

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Apr 11th, 11:00 AM Apr 11th, 11:00 AM

Physical Activity and Body Composition Measures of Elementary-Aged School Children on an American Indian Reservation

Physical Activity and Body Composition Measures of Elementary-Aged School Children on an American Indian Reservation

1Kemp, C., 1Schreiner, A., 2Kavanagh, D., and 1Yonts, B.

1Department of Health and Human Performance, Exercise Science, The University of Montana—Missoula; 2Department of Health and Human Performance, Community Health, The University of Montana—Missoula

Childhood obesity and diabetes are major public health concerns. American Indian (AI) children are at increased risk for these diseases. Physical inactivity and high body mass index (BMI) are risk factors for obesity and diabetes. The purpose of this study was to collect body composition measures and physical activity (PA) counts for elementary school-age children on an AI reservation. A total of 61 children (28 males and 33 females) participated in the body composition measures. These included weight, height, and waist circumference—BMI was calculated with the equation weight(kg)/height(m)2 and converted to BMI-for-age percentiles. Physical activity was measured by direct observation. Three sections of the recess playground were designated as zones: Zone 1 was an asphalt area, Zone 2 contained playground structures, and Zone 3 was an open field. Each zone was video recorded for 10 minutes during a recess period for four school days. PA counts were classified as sedentary, walking, or active. The mean BMI-for-age was at the 67th percentile and mean waist circumference was 72.3cm (±11.7cm). The PA data showed girls had more sedentary counts (12.2 ± 3.5) and active counts (8.0 ± 2.1) in Zone 2 compared to Zone 1 (sedentary counts= 2.3 ± 1.3; active counts= 2.7 ± 1.6) or Zone 3 (sedentary counts=0 ± 0; active counts= 0 ± 0). Boys had more sedentary counts (4.7 ± 2.2) and active counts (4.7 ± 2.8) in Zone 2 than either Zone 1 (sedentary counts= 2.4 ± 1.5; active counts= 3.8 ± 2.1) or Zone 3 (sedentary counts= 0.9 ± 1; active counts= 3.8 ± 2.9). These data were the baseline results of a pilot study designed to increase PA during recess in 3rd, 4th, 5th, and 6th grade children in this AI community.