Title

An Examination of Religiosity Among Rural, Suburban, and Urban School Psychologists

Presentation Type

Poster

Abstract

An Examination of Religiosity Among
Rural, Suburban, and Urban School Psychologists
Abstract
Religion reflects an individual’s culture and values, and is defined as a system of organized beliefs, attitudes and values (Gorsuch, 1988). Research has shown that almost one third of therapists believe that their religious beliefs influence their practice of psychotherapy to a very large degree, while another third believe it influences their practice moderately (Bilgrave & Deluty, 2002). For this reason, it is important for psychologists to be aware of their religious beliefs and how they may influence the provision of care. The goal of this study is to examine the religious beliefs and values of school psychologists who work in rural, suburban, and urban settings. Furthermore, this study will examine whether or not there is an association between a school psychologist’s age and their self-reported religiosity. A survey was sent to school psychologists working in public schools in the United States. The first 100 respondents were used in this study. Items on the survey include a demographic questionnaire and the Duke Religion Index (DRI). The DRI is a 5-item scale used to measure religiosity and includes statements like: “My religious or spiritual beliefs are what really lies behind my whole approach to life.” Analysis of variance (ANOVA) will be used to compare the religious beliefs of rural, urban and suburban school psychologists. This research study contributes to the existing literature examining personal beliefs and how they may be associated with school psychological practice. It could also potentially aid in the appropriate preparation of a clinician going into an area with a different degree of religiosity than their own.

Category

Social Sciences

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Apr 11th, 11:00 AM Apr 11th, 12:00 PM

An Examination of Religiosity Among Rural, Suburban, and Urban School Psychologists

An Examination of Religiosity Among
Rural, Suburban, and Urban School Psychologists
Abstract
Religion reflects an individual’s culture and values, and is defined as a system of organized beliefs, attitudes and values (Gorsuch, 1988). Research has shown that almost one third of therapists believe that their religious beliefs influence their practice of psychotherapy to a very large degree, while another third believe it influences their practice moderately (Bilgrave & Deluty, 2002). For this reason, it is important for psychologists to be aware of their religious beliefs and how they may influence the provision of care. The goal of this study is to examine the religious beliefs and values of school psychologists who work in rural, suburban, and urban settings. Furthermore, this study will examine whether or not there is an association between a school psychologist’s age and their self-reported religiosity. A survey was sent to school psychologists working in public schools in the United States. The first 100 respondents were used in this study. Items on the survey include a demographic questionnaire and the Duke Religion Index (DRI). The DRI is a 5-item scale used to measure religiosity and includes statements like: “My religious or spiritual beliefs are what really lies behind my whole approach to life.” Analysis of variance (ANOVA) will be used to compare the religious beliefs of rural, urban and suburban school psychologists. This research study contributes to the existing literature examining personal beliefs and how they may be associated with school psychological practice. It could also potentially aid in the appropriate preparation of a clinician going into an area with a different degree of religiosity than their own.