Presentation Type

Poster

Abstract

Aphasia is an impairment of language production and comprehension that results from damage to the language centers of the brain following stroke and other brain injuries. Approximately 80,000 individuals acquire aphasia from stroke each year in the U.S.; approximately one million people in the U.S. currently have aphasia. The most frequently occurring symptom of aphasia is anomia, a difficulty accessing and retrieving spoken words. Anomia is a frustrating symptom of aphasia for stroke survivors and significantly impacts successful social communication. One way to treat this impairment is through repetitive and intense exposure and practice of picture naming. Our study seeks to compare low-dose and high-dose exposure and repetition of spoken words during a naming protocol. This approach differs from previous studies that have focused on either the type of treatment being offered or the overall amount of treatment provided. The purpose of this project is to evaluate the training effects within and across sessions and to evaluate inter-rater reliability across sessions. Stroke survivors engaged in 5 weeks of highly intensive picture naming training. Their naming abilities were tested before, during, and after training sessions to evaluate improvement. All sessions were video recorded. To assess within-session variability and the small, incremental daily improvements, each production made by the participant during training was analyzed. Independent variables included the frequency that the word exists in American English, syllable length, and the number of repetitions during each training session. To evaluate reliability, the video recordings of testing before, during, and after training sessions were coded as correct or incorrect by a reliability judge. This data was then compared to the original data documented by the research examiner. The results from this study will inform optimal treatment delivery techniques for speech-language pathologists working with persons with aphasia.

Category

Social Sciences

Share

COinS
 
Apr 11th, 11:00 AM Apr 11th, 12:00 PM

Neuroplasticity, Dosage and Repetition Priming Effects in Individuals with Stroke Induced Aphasia

Aphasia is an impairment of language production and comprehension that results from damage to the language centers of the brain following stroke and other brain injuries. Approximately 80,000 individuals acquire aphasia from stroke each year in the U.S.; approximately one million people in the U.S. currently have aphasia. The most frequently occurring symptom of aphasia is anomia, a difficulty accessing and retrieving spoken words. Anomia is a frustrating symptom of aphasia for stroke survivors and significantly impacts successful social communication. One way to treat this impairment is through repetitive and intense exposure and practice of picture naming. Our study seeks to compare low-dose and high-dose exposure and repetition of spoken words during a naming protocol. This approach differs from previous studies that have focused on either the type of treatment being offered or the overall amount of treatment provided. The purpose of this project is to evaluate the training effects within and across sessions and to evaluate inter-rater reliability across sessions. Stroke survivors engaged in 5 weeks of highly intensive picture naming training. Their naming abilities were tested before, during, and after training sessions to evaluate improvement. All sessions were video recorded. To assess within-session variability and the small, incremental daily improvements, each production made by the participant during training was analyzed. Independent variables included the frequency that the word exists in American English, syllable length, and the number of repetitions during each training session. To evaluate reliability, the video recordings of testing before, during, and after training sessions were coded as correct or incorrect by a reliability judge. This data was then compared to the original data documented by the research examiner. The results from this study will inform optimal treatment delivery techniques for speech-language pathologists working with persons with aphasia.