Title

Monitoring herbicide and seeding efficacy on a Bromus inermis dominated rangeland.

Presentation Type

Poster

Abstract

My research examines the efficacy of the herbicide glyphosate on Bromus inermis on an applied scale and to design and test a monitoring plan for measuring abundance and richness for grasslands dominated by one species.

The experiment builds off the work of Bahm et al. (2011) where he identified effective herbicides to control Bromus inermis. My experiment asks whether chemical applications followed by seeding is appropriate management on an applied scale.

Additionally, I look at whether a monitoring program involving similar levels of sampling would be statistically appropriate for future monitoring efforts. Many monitoring plans use inappropriate designs to gather usable data. My experiment shows how difficult it is to collect an appropriate amount of data and I make recommendations for managers on how to monitor.

This experiment builds off of many years of work on controlling Bromus inermis and asks restoration questions on an applied scale rather than on a small, experimental scale. I also offer monitoring designs for managers to gather data in a rangeland in order to understand how effective management was.

Methods: All sampling was done over the summer of 2013 on Allied Waste of Missoula’s property in the North Hills. I laid out 12 50X50 meter experimental units. Within each experimental unit I used 150 Daubenmire plots to sample species richness and abundance. In the Fall of 2013 6 assigned plots were sprayed with a glyphosate mix. Two weeks following the herbicide application I broadcast seed over 10 plots. Two plots, one with herbicide and one without herbicide, remained as a control.

Category

Life Sciences

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Apr 11th, 12:11 AM Apr 11th, 12:12 AM

Monitoring herbicide and seeding efficacy on a Bromus inermis dominated rangeland.

My research examines the efficacy of the herbicide glyphosate on Bromus inermis on an applied scale and to design and test a monitoring plan for measuring abundance and richness for grasslands dominated by one species.

The experiment builds off the work of Bahm et al. (2011) where he identified effective herbicides to control Bromus inermis. My experiment asks whether chemical applications followed by seeding is appropriate management on an applied scale.

Additionally, I look at whether a monitoring program involving similar levels of sampling would be statistically appropriate for future monitoring efforts. Many monitoring plans use inappropriate designs to gather usable data. My experiment shows how difficult it is to collect an appropriate amount of data and I make recommendations for managers on how to monitor.

This experiment builds off of many years of work on controlling Bromus inermis and asks restoration questions on an applied scale rather than on a small, experimental scale. I also offer monitoring designs for managers to gather data in a rangeland in order to understand how effective management was.

Methods: All sampling was done over the summer of 2013 on Allied Waste of Missoula’s property in the North Hills. I laid out 12 50X50 meter experimental units. Within each experimental unit I used 150 Daubenmire plots to sample species richness and abundance. In the Fall of 2013 6 assigned plots were sprayed with a glyphosate mix. Two weeks following the herbicide application I broadcast seed over 10 plots. Two plots, one with herbicide and one without herbicide, remained as a control.