Presentation Type

Poster

Abstract

Purpose: The American Speech-Language and Hearing Association (ASHA) Scope of Practice in Speech-Language Pathology states that counseling is an integral component of speech-language pathologists’ (SLPs’) application of clinical services. This requirement was implemented in 2007, leaving SLPs who graduated prior to this date lacking in training and education regarding counseling techniques that integrate with remediation. The University of Montana housed the only Communicative Sciences and Disorders (CSD) department in Montana until 1989, when it was closed due to budgetary cuts. There were no CSD programs in Montana from 1990 until 2008 when the program was reinstated, leaving a 20 year gap in service. The SLPs who graduated prior to this closure were not under the 2007 ASHA dictation that they must provide counseling in therapeutic remediation. Although there is much information about the role of counseling in SLP services regarding acquired language disorders, fluency disorders, and developmental disorders, little is published about the role of counseling in interventions with adolescents struggling with language-literacy difficulties. The literature review discusses counseling techniques used by SLPs in remediation as well as counseling for clients with language-literacy difficulties.

Question: Are Montana SLP’s who graduated prior to 2007 more or less likely to incorporate counseling services into therapy sessions as measured by an online survey.

Question: Do Montana SLPs provide counseling services to adult clients and parents of young clients more so than adolescent clients as measured by an online survey.

Question: Are counseling services implemented by Montana SLPs disorder specific, mostly relating to acquired disorders such as TBI and aphasia or disorders across the ASHA Scope of Practice as measured by an online survey.

Methods: The participants in this study will be selected from the 421 certified SLPs who are members of the Montana Speech Language and Hearing Association.

Category

Life Sciences

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Apr 11th, 11:00 AM Apr 11th, 12:00 PM

The Counseling Role of the Speech Language Pathologist

Purpose: The American Speech-Language and Hearing Association (ASHA) Scope of Practice in Speech-Language Pathology states that counseling is an integral component of speech-language pathologists’ (SLPs’) application of clinical services. This requirement was implemented in 2007, leaving SLPs who graduated prior to this date lacking in training and education regarding counseling techniques that integrate with remediation. The University of Montana housed the only Communicative Sciences and Disorders (CSD) department in Montana until 1989, when it was closed due to budgetary cuts. There were no CSD programs in Montana from 1990 until 2008 when the program was reinstated, leaving a 20 year gap in service. The SLPs who graduated prior to this closure were not under the 2007 ASHA dictation that they must provide counseling in therapeutic remediation. Although there is much information about the role of counseling in SLP services regarding acquired language disorders, fluency disorders, and developmental disorders, little is published about the role of counseling in interventions with adolescents struggling with language-literacy difficulties. The literature review discusses counseling techniques used by SLPs in remediation as well as counseling for clients with language-literacy difficulties.

Question: Are Montana SLP’s who graduated prior to 2007 more or less likely to incorporate counseling services into therapy sessions as measured by an online survey.

Question: Do Montana SLPs provide counseling services to adult clients and parents of young clients more so than adolescent clients as measured by an online survey.

Question: Are counseling services implemented by Montana SLPs disorder specific, mostly relating to acquired disorders such as TBI and aphasia or disorders across the ASHA Scope of Practice as measured by an online survey.

Methods: The participants in this study will be selected from the 421 certified SLPs who are members of the Montana Speech Language and Hearing Association.