Presentation Type

Poster

Abstract

As the world was swept into war for the second time during the twentieth century, countries across the globe turned to propaganda to increase support for the war and commitment to victory. Drawing upon propagandist films and posters from major Allied and Axis countries, several themes emerge, such as hatred for the enemy, provided a boost in civilian morale, and encouraged women’s participation in the workforce. Patriotism materialized through these films and posters, but it is through the savvy world leaders that it stuck. This new wave of world leaders (Franklin D. Roosevelt, Winston Churchill, Adolf Hitler) were not like any before them, a group of men who were media-savvy, outspoken, influential, and effective public speakers. Through the use of media and public speeches, these leaders pulled their respective countries from the depths of despair to war powers, which saw civilians and soldiers alike rallying for the cause. This paper examines the effect of propaganda on civilians, both before the war, and during.

Category

Humanities

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Apr 11th, 3:00 PM Apr 11th, 4:00 PM

Propaganda With the World at War

As the world was swept into war for the second time during the twentieth century, countries across the globe turned to propaganda to increase support for the war and commitment to victory. Drawing upon propagandist films and posters from major Allied and Axis countries, several themes emerge, such as hatred for the enemy, provided a boost in civilian morale, and encouraged women’s participation in the workforce. Patriotism materialized through these films and posters, but it is through the savvy world leaders that it stuck. This new wave of world leaders (Franklin D. Roosevelt, Winston Churchill, Adolf Hitler) were not like any before them, a group of men who were media-savvy, outspoken, influential, and effective public speakers. Through the use of media and public speeches, these leaders pulled their respective countries from the depths of despair to war powers, which saw civilians and soldiers alike rallying for the cause. This paper examines the effect of propaganda on civilians, both before the war, and during.