Presentation Type

Poster

Abstract

The Effects of Environmental Context on Correct and False Recognition Memory

Kevin Kuper

This study investigates how human memory, both correct recognition and false recognition memory can be influenced by environmental context. For the study, participants were randomly assigned to one of the two groups. Both groups received lists of semantically related words and were asked to remember them in a typical lab. Then, for the recognition memory test, one group of the participants moved into a new room, which looked very different from the first room (different context condition), while the other group stayed in the same room (same context condition). Performance was measured as the rate of ‘yes’ responses to the test words. For the targets, which were the words presented during the study session, recognition memory performance was greater for the same context condition than for the different context condition. For the critical lures, which were the words not presented during the study session but related to the sematic categories, recognition memory performance did not differ between the two conditions. The results provide evidence for the context-dependent memory of correct recognition and suggest that environment context has no or little effect on false recognition.

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Social Sciences

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Apr 11th, 3:00 PM Apr 11th, 4:00 PM

The Effects of Environmental Context on Correct and False Recognition Memory

The Effects of Environmental Context on Correct and False Recognition Memory

Kevin Kuper

This study investigates how human memory, both correct recognition and false recognition memory can be influenced by environmental context. For the study, participants were randomly assigned to one of the two groups. Both groups received lists of semantically related words and were asked to remember them in a typical lab. Then, for the recognition memory test, one group of the participants moved into a new room, which looked very different from the first room (different context condition), while the other group stayed in the same room (same context condition). Performance was measured as the rate of ‘yes’ responses to the test words. For the targets, which were the words presented during the study session, recognition memory performance was greater for the same context condition than for the different context condition. For the critical lures, which were the words not presented during the study session but related to the sematic categories, recognition memory performance did not differ between the two conditions. The results provide evidence for the context-dependent memory of correct recognition and suggest that environment context has no or little effect on false recognition.