Title

Stereotypical Behavior in Captive Tigers

Presentation Type

Poster

Abstract

Stereotypical behaviors are repetitive behaviors that appear to have no obvious goal or function - such as repetitive pacing, swaying, head-bobbing or circling. It is thought that these behaviors may be caused by frustration, an inability to develop natural behavior patterns, impaired brain function, or repeated unsuccessful attempts to deal with some problem. The present study sought to create an ethogram for examining stereotypical behaviors of eight tigers at the Bush Gardens tiger exhibit. The ethogram was created to include the location within the habitat where behaviors occurred as well as whether the behaviors were undesirable, locomotive, social, observational or self-motivated. Of interest was whether stereotypical behaviors were confined to specific enclosure areas or in response to elements of the daily park routine such as keeper interactions. Findings from this research will aide in the development of better habitats to promote the well-being and care of the tigers.

Category

Life Sciences

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Apr 17th, 11:00 AM Apr 17th, 12:00 PM

Stereotypical Behavior in Captive Tigers

South UC Ballroom

Stereotypical behaviors are repetitive behaviors that appear to have no obvious goal or function - such as repetitive pacing, swaying, head-bobbing or circling. It is thought that these behaviors may be caused by frustration, an inability to develop natural behavior patterns, impaired brain function, or repeated unsuccessful attempts to deal with some problem. The present study sought to create an ethogram for examining stereotypical behaviors of eight tigers at the Bush Gardens tiger exhibit. The ethogram was created to include the location within the habitat where behaviors occurred as well as whether the behaviors were undesirable, locomotive, social, observational or self-motivated. Of interest was whether stereotypical behaviors were confined to specific enclosure areas or in response to elements of the daily park routine such as keeper interactions. Findings from this research will aide in the development of better habitats to promote the well-being and care of the tigers.