Title

Digging Deeper: Qualitative Analysis of Rural & Suburban School Psychologists’ Job Satisfaction

Presentation Type

Poster

Abstract

School psychologists play an important role in children’s academic success and overall well-being. These professionals experience a number of career-related challenges and job satisfaction may play an important role in their ability to support children. Job satisfaction is associated with work quality, organizational commitment, motivation, burnout, achievement, and absenteeism (Worrell, Skaggs & Brown, 2006). One study suggested that nearly 91% of school psychologists are either satisfied or very satisfied with their jobs (Worrell, 2007). Recent research, however, shows differences in job satisfaction between school psychologists who work in RTI schools versus non-RTI schools (Bade-White 2013). Thus, job satisfaction of school psychologists could greatly vary depending on the school and location. There are a number of other factors, however, that may contribute to school psychologists’ job satisfaction that warrant further investigation. In an earlier pilot study, preliminary qualitative analyses showed that rural school psychologists are concerned with having more time and implementing interventions, whereas suburban psychologists’ want increased time and direct contact with their students. The purpose of this study is to further examine the roles and contributing factors surrounding the job satisfaction of rural and suburban school psychologists through qualitative research methodology. Specifically, we will examine the themes derived from rural and suburban school psychologists’ comments about their careers. An online survey was completed by 188 school psychologists in rural (n = 94) and suburban (n = 94) areas in the Pacific Northwest and Rocky Mountain regions. Participants answered open-ended questions about their current and desired roles. We will conduct a qualitative analysis using NVivo software to reveal common and differential sub-themes of the previous concerns found within the pilot study. Improving school psychologists’ job satisfaction may result in more effective services rendered towards children in rural communities, such as those in Montana.

Category

Social Sciences

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Apr 17th, 3:00 PM Apr 17th, 4:00 PM

Digging Deeper: Qualitative Analysis of Rural & Suburban School Psychologists’ Job Satisfaction

South UC Ballroom

School psychologists play an important role in children’s academic success and overall well-being. These professionals experience a number of career-related challenges and job satisfaction may play an important role in their ability to support children. Job satisfaction is associated with work quality, organizational commitment, motivation, burnout, achievement, and absenteeism (Worrell, Skaggs & Brown, 2006). One study suggested that nearly 91% of school psychologists are either satisfied or very satisfied with their jobs (Worrell, 2007). Recent research, however, shows differences in job satisfaction between school psychologists who work in RTI schools versus non-RTI schools (Bade-White 2013). Thus, job satisfaction of school psychologists could greatly vary depending on the school and location. There are a number of other factors, however, that may contribute to school psychologists’ job satisfaction that warrant further investigation. In an earlier pilot study, preliminary qualitative analyses showed that rural school psychologists are concerned with having more time and implementing interventions, whereas suburban psychologists’ want increased time and direct contact with their students. The purpose of this study is to further examine the roles and contributing factors surrounding the job satisfaction of rural and suburban school psychologists through qualitative research methodology. Specifically, we will examine the themes derived from rural and suburban school psychologists’ comments about their careers. An online survey was completed by 188 school psychologists in rural (n = 94) and suburban (n = 94) areas in the Pacific Northwest and Rocky Mountain regions. Participants answered open-ended questions about their current and desired roles. We will conduct a qualitative analysis using NVivo software to reveal common and differential sub-themes of the previous concerns found within the pilot study. Improving school psychologists’ job satisfaction may result in more effective services rendered towards children in rural communities, such as those in Montana.