Title

Qualitative Analysis on Consecutive Violent Relationship Risk

Presentation Type

Poster

Abstract

Established research shows that women who are physically or sexually victimized are at greater risk for subsequent relationship with Intimate Partner Violence (IPV), than those who are not victimized. In research conducted by H.M. Woodby, he stated, “One of [the] long-term effects is the potential for subsequent re-victimization by abusers other than the original perpetrator”. Others, (Belmont, 2011) explored re-victimization further by looking at “differences between victims and non-victims in terms of the characteristics that they are attracted to in potential partners and subsequent risk for being in an abusive relationship”. Belmont discovered that “Items that were endorsed as more attractive by previous victims consisted of characteristics indicative of jealousy, controlling behaviors, and aggressiveness“. The objective was to continue exploration by discovering what thoughts, beliefs, attitudes, and ideas influence women’s attraction to high-risk characteristics in intimate relationship partners. Using a qualitative interview, the study explored the relationship experiences of women who were in more than one violent relationship experience. Questions were developed to inquire about relationship styles, attitudes, and behaviors that describe are current and past relationships. Particular attention is made to lessons women identify that they discover through intimate relationships. Participants were 10 women who were victims of physical or sexual violence who agreed to interviews through the psychology department or the YWCA Program. The qualitative design will use Grounded theory, “…a series of cumulative coding cycles and reflective analytic memoing to develop major categories for theory generation” (Miles, Huberman, & Saldana). Qualitative analysis of the themes and information provided by the women will be conducted using NVIVO. The results of the study will be used to guide our understanding of possible variables to explore in a larger quantitative study intended to develop to approaches to prevention of further victimization of women already exposed to interpersonal violence.

Category

Social Sciences

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Apr 17th, 3:00 PM Apr 17th, 4:00 PM

Qualitative Analysis on Consecutive Violent Relationship Risk

South UC Ballroom

Established research shows that women who are physically or sexually victimized are at greater risk for subsequent relationship with Intimate Partner Violence (IPV), than those who are not victimized. In research conducted by H.M. Woodby, he stated, “One of [the] long-term effects is the potential for subsequent re-victimization by abusers other than the original perpetrator”. Others, (Belmont, 2011) explored re-victimization further by looking at “differences between victims and non-victims in terms of the characteristics that they are attracted to in potential partners and subsequent risk for being in an abusive relationship”. Belmont discovered that “Items that were endorsed as more attractive by previous victims consisted of characteristics indicative of jealousy, controlling behaviors, and aggressiveness“. The objective was to continue exploration by discovering what thoughts, beliefs, attitudes, and ideas influence women’s attraction to high-risk characteristics in intimate relationship partners. Using a qualitative interview, the study explored the relationship experiences of women who were in more than one violent relationship experience. Questions were developed to inquire about relationship styles, attitudes, and behaviors that describe are current and past relationships. Particular attention is made to lessons women identify that they discover through intimate relationships. Participants were 10 women who were victims of physical or sexual violence who agreed to interviews through the psychology department or the YWCA Program. The qualitative design will use Grounded theory, “…a series of cumulative coding cycles and reflective analytic memoing to develop major categories for theory generation” (Miles, Huberman, & Saldana). Qualitative analysis of the themes and information provided by the women will be conducted using NVIVO. The results of the study will be used to guide our understanding of possible variables to explore in a larger quantitative study intended to develop to approaches to prevention of further victimization of women already exposed to interpersonal violence.