Title

Improvement in Patient-Reported Confidence and Function in People with Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using Jump Training

Presentation Type

Poster

Abstract

Following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, patients often show decreased confidence in and function of their surgical limbs. Landing from a jump is a task that often evokes patient apprehension. Jump training to gradually expose patients to this fear-inducing task may increase patient confidence and mitigate their fear. Such strategies have not been employed in a population with ACL reconstruction, nor has the subjective experience of high-level training following knee surgery been explored. We sampled 16 people (10 female, 6 male) between the ages of 15 and 32 (mean = 25 ± 5 yrs) who had undergone ACL reconstruction and returned to activity, but had poorer than expected daily function, low levels of confidence, and mechanical deficits in landing. All subjects completed 8 weeks of twice-weekly jump training. The International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) Subjective Knee Form and the ACL-Return to Sport after Injury (ACL-RSI) surveys were administered to subjects pre-training (0 weeks) and post-training (8 weeks) to evaluate how confidence in their knee as well as their report of knee function changed over time. Compared to other studies in which subjects do not undergo extensive training, our subjects saw significant changes. Physical function, as measured by IKDC, increased 15% over 8 weeks (week 0: mean = 77 ± 9%; week 8: mean = 88 ± 8%; p = .001), while confidence, as measured by ACL-RSI increased 44% (week 0: mean = 55 ± 17%; week 8: mean = 79 ± 18%; p < .001). Jump training substantially improves patient-reported functional outcomes and psychological readiness to return to strenuous activity for people with less than optimal outcomes after ACL reconstruction. Implementing jump training should be considered as a part of post-operative rehabilitation as a means to address prevalent psychological impairments.

Category

Life Sciences

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Apr 17th, 3:00 PM Apr 17th, 4:00 PM

Improvement in Patient-Reported Confidence and Function in People with Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using Jump Training

South UC Ballroom

Following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, patients often show decreased confidence in and function of their surgical limbs. Landing from a jump is a task that often evokes patient apprehension. Jump training to gradually expose patients to this fear-inducing task may increase patient confidence and mitigate their fear. Such strategies have not been employed in a population with ACL reconstruction, nor has the subjective experience of high-level training following knee surgery been explored. We sampled 16 people (10 female, 6 male) between the ages of 15 and 32 (mean = 25 ± 5 yrs) who had undergone ACL reconstruction and returned to activity, but had poorer than expected daily function, low levels of confidence, and mechanical deficits in landing. All subjects completed 8 weeks of twice-weekly jump training. The International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) Subjective Knee Form and the ACL-Return to Sport after Injury (ACL-RSI) surveys were administered to subjects pre-training (0 weeks) and post-training (8 weeks) to evaluate how confidence in their knee as well as their report of knee function changed over time. Compared to other studies in which subjects do not undergo extensive training, our subjects saw significant changes. Physical function, as measured by IKDC, increased 15% over 8 weeks (week 0: mean = 77 ± 9%; week 8: mean = 88 ± 8%; p = .001), while confidence, as measured by ACL-RSI increased 44% (week 0: mean = 55 ± 17%; week 8: mean = 79 ± 18%; p < .001). Jump training substantially improves patient-reported functional outcomes and psychological readiness to return to strenuous activity for people with less than optimal outcomes after ACL reconstruction. Implementing jump training should be considered as a part of post-operative rehabilitation as a means to address prevalent psychological impairments.