Title

Skeletal preservation and articulation of a White-Tailed Deer

Presentation Type

Poster

Abstract

Many of the wildlife specimens collected and retained in natural history museums are just the pelts, taxidermied heads and bodies, and skulls of the animals. More rare are complete skeletons, which not only preserve the bones of the animal but also the character of it’s internal skeletal anatomy. In the current age of extinction, it is important to retain complete specimens for future scientific research. Fully articulated skeletons are rare because of the time consuming nature of their assembly. The University of Montana is home to countless wildlife specimens, but only a few of them are fully articulated skeletons. I sought to add to the University’s collection by completing and donating an articulated skeleton of a White-tailed deer buck. Instructions in the methods of skeletal articulations for all species, including deer, are limited, so I also created a detailed how-to manual of my project. I fully disassembled and cleaned the bones of a complete White-tailed deer carcass. I then used a ungulate bone building manual by Lee Post, wire, glue, and metal rods to completely reassemble the skeleton in an anatomically correct manner. The articulated skeleton will be on display at the Davidson Honors College for future student learning, inspiration, and curiosity.

Category

Life Sciences

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Apr 15th, 11:00 AM Apr 15th, 12:00 PM

Skeletal preservation and articulation of a White-Tailed Deer

Many of the wildlife specimens collected and retained in natural history museums are just the pelts, taxidermied heads and bodies, and skulls of the animals. More rare are complete skeletons, which not only preserve the bones of the animal but also the character of it’s internal skeletal anatomy. In the current age of extinction, it is important to retain complete specimens for future scientific research. Fully articulated skeletons are rare because of the time consuming nature of their assembly. The University of Montana is home to countless wildlife specimens, but only a few of them are fully articulated skeletons. I sought to add to the University’s collection by completing and donating an articulated skeleton of a White-tailed deer buck. Instructions in the methods of skeletal articulations for all species, including deer, are limited, so I also created a detailed how-to manual of my project. I fully disassembled and cleaned the bones of a complete White-tailed deer carcass. I then used a ungulate bone building manual by Lee Post, wire, glue, and metal rods to completely reassemble the skeleton in an anatomically correct manner. The articulated skeleton will be on display at the Davidson Honors College for future student learning, inspiration, and curiosity.